This Is Not A Wedding; wedding parties, anarchy and dance….

For this Culture Vulture Interview….i’ve got a goody! I wanted to interview them a few months ago but alas it did not work out. I’ve been watching Gracefool Collective from a far (queen of sounding creepy over here) for some time and their current touring show, is just SO Culture Vulture.

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Full of anarchy, songs you will love, an existential crisis and wedding bells….’This Is Not A Wedding’ is a must see show and it’s coming to Arts Centre Washington on 3rd October – you need to get your tickets ASAP! As someone who is full of anarchy myself, proud feminist and unmarried and over 30, this is all right up my street and so timely…….especially as Mama Horts talks like this on repeat…. ….

”So…when will you get married?”

“Girls with tattoos don’t look very nice in wedding dresses”

“It must not be very serious, if you’re not engaged yet?”

“I always wanted to wear a hat”

“Do you think you will ever get married”

“You know most people your age are married, with a house and kids….”

Uh huh. That’s a lot of pressure. For the record, I’d make a terrible “wife” in the traditional sense – that power relationship has never sat well with me since a child; I remember being so confused as to why women gave up their name and saying to my Mum, “but I really like my name”. I guess marriage is about compromise – but I’ve always seen it as losing my identity, something “grown-ups” did and like a bigger version of Christmas….and I hate Christmas.

However, I treated my 30th birthday like a wedding. It was MEGA – invitations, venue, cake, DJ, cheese cake tower, decorations, speeches, drinks on arrival and I devised a quiz all about myself for attendees……it was my 30th birthday and I can host a quiz about myself, if I want to…..

I digress…. So yeah, weddings aren’t for me. My pals aren’t really the type to get married either….. all in long term things but quite happy as they are. A part from my best Kate, who had the wedding to end weddings…..the only wedding I’ve ever really properly enjoyed going to. It was mint…. Such good time, good vibes and so much cheese. None of the boring stuff……it was genuinely lush and Kate’s take on a traditional wedding.

So I’m loving the sound of Gracefool Collectives’ new show and of course, I’m totally there seeing it at Arts Centre Washington on 3rd October (AND YOU CAN TOO – BY GETTING YOUR TICKETS HERE ) but I thought I’d catch up with Rachel from the company and find out more about these brilliantly talented folk who seem like my creative soul mates.

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Well hello, Rachel, from another Rachel! Do you think they’ve realised us Rachels’ are slowly taking over the world? Tell my readers a bit about you?

I’m Rachel from Gracefool Collective. We four Gracefools, make post-intellectual-pseudo-spiritual-feminist-comedy-dance.

Tell me about your journey into the arts?

I started via the classic route of a baby ballerina in the local pantomime in Bridport, Dorset. I did high octane roles such as ‘sunbeam’ and ‘jewel’ and ‘storm,’ before deciding I liked things a bit more abstract and took G.C.S.E. and A level contemporary dance. After a stint in the youth dance company in Dorset, I thought I’d give dance school auditions a try and somehow ended up at the amazing Northern School of Contemporary Dance.

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Ohhh I was a baby ballerina…..but I lack the necessary grace, precision and I’m not very girly….more stompy! So, how did Gracefool Collective start and what united you?

We were all in each other’s choreographies at NSCD and were united by a general creeping feeling that we found some contemporary dance a little beige. We figured out we preferred disco balls, satire and copious amounts of glitter and it snowballed from there.

In our third year, we made a work together which was an interactive auction with a rapper as the auctioneer and a barbershop quartet of phone bidders. You could bid on lots such as ‘true love,’ ‘mojo’ and my personal favourite, ‘ghost in a jar.’

Now, we make work which is feminist, forthright and fiercely funny. We make wildly entertaining interdisciplinary contemporary performances about the absurdities of modern existence. We aim to provoke, delight, and defy convention through a series of sketches, scenes and images that offer a mixture of play and provocation. This still comes with a side of glitter.

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Honestly, you are all my soul mates… I wish to be covered in glitter at all times and hear the call of the disco ball daily. So, tell me about the show at Arts Centre Washington in Sunderland? When is it?

‘This Is Not A Wedding’ captures the pressure of coming of age in a celebration event like no other. Four bridal-clad women desperately and determinedly offer new versions of long standing traditions reminiscent of rite of passage ceremonies. Over one hour, they embark on acts of anarchy, including a perfunctory sexy version of Pachelbel’s Canon in D and an apocalyptic karaoke sermon featuring Edith Piaf. They roll down the aisle in a ball of brides, perform a robotic bridal march to Taking Head’s Road to Nowhere and make existential speeches questioning the meaning of life. The performers consistently negotiate with the audience – ‘guests’, asking for suggestions and appealing for feedback. Through fast-paced comedic scenes, we communicate our confusion about the expectations of adulthood, all whilst keeping our ‘guests’ satisfied. The pressure and tension of whether we have been successful is constantly questioned. You know that existential crisis about all your achievements that you have when you approach 30? We’ve tried to put that on stage!

This non-wedding event invites audiences to question the rigidity of life’s milestones, celebrating non-conformity, personal choice and the challenge of coming of age.

It’s at Arts Centre Washington on the 3rd October, 7.30pm, £9 / £7.50 (conc) / £5 (Students).

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Yep…. My life is on long existential crisis/ social experiment….. Why did you make a show about weddings? What was the inspo?

In all honesty we started by just wanting to a make a show which had a semi recognisable structure. We thought this might be easier to pin our ideas around! But as all good Gracefool pieces end up, slowly our personal crises entered the work. We were all questioning what we were doing with our lives and what the next steps were. That morphed it into a show which now doesn’t look like a wedding at all, but just uses the idea of the wedding or celebration event to frame our thoughts about the pressure of time and the deadlines society expects us to achieve.

When seeing the title, lots of people have asked if we don’t like weddings, but it’s not as clear cut as that. As feminists we naturally question the traditions that are expected of us as women, but we appreciate the power of bringing two families and communities together and the moments that celebrate being alive. Plus, we LOVE a good party.

Our questions are more about how this seems to still be considered the pinnacle of a woman’s success. There seems to be a point where everyone starts to question when you are going to get married or have children. Deviating from this norm can feel like a real rebellion or even be perceived as frightening or unacceptable. What if you have other priorities or beliefs?

Adding to that, there is a huge amount in the show about time – am I supposed to have done all the things I wanted to by now???

Really, we’re just giving you a window into the inner chaos of our minds.

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I do love chaos….So what can audience members expect and why should they come?

This Is Not A Wedding is for anyone interested in laughing, crying, singing, dancing, coming of age, coming together or coming apart at the seams. Come along for riotous fun, or as one of our audience members said,  “a bonkers hour of clowning & baffoonery … but like all excellent fooling [with] an undercurrent of deep questioning about life & it’s meaning”.

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Any audience feedback so far? Any quotes you can share?

Here are some of the best:

“@gracefoolC ‘s #Thisisnotawedding was brilliant – dark clowning with a serious undertone about life and existence …a Samuel Beckett in a wedding dress!”

“AMAZING! Anarchic, thoughtful, clever, unpredictable, contemplative- surprisingly moving at one moment of bleaker vulnerability. And just hilarious.”

“Totally joyous, cheeky, self-aware, laugh out loud fun and all wrapped up in poignancy. Winner.”

“Such a clever exploration of recognisable rituals, really rich with imagery, feisty and stylish. Impressive stuff.”

“Loved this last night! You’re a mighty, talented and gutsy collective of women with awesome comic timing #Thankyou”

“Thanks for having me, Gracefools! I laughed hard and long – congrats on another great show.”

“You guys completely cracked it…some of the best work I’ve seen in 30yrs in dance and theatre”

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Sum the show up in 3 words?

Anarchic, raucous, unpredictable

Do you have an idea of your “perfect” wedding? (Mine has always been in trainers and non conventional – big party….artist commissions for the decorations)

A massive party with great (preferably unlimited) food and an excellent sound system. I’m getting married next year and there are alpacas at the venue. Perfect right?

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Yesss! If I was getting married Sebastian (my cat) would be my best man…..Why does society fixate on the brides dress? Why does society fixate on the traditions?

I don’t know really, it seems odd when you really look at it. The dress is such a big tradition – we know what a bride is ‘supposed’ to look like. We like things that make us feel part of the ‘group’ and if we all do the same then we’re part of that right?

Or, maybe there is so much uncertainty in life now maybe we like to hold on to things that feel certain? I guess that we like things that make us feel safe and like we understand the,. Perhaps because there is so much choice now, it’s safer to go with the route we know, which is why it can be seen as scary if someone takes a path you haven’t considered. Anything can be scary at first if you haven’t experienced it, or know someone who has. Plus, I suppose as a society we aren’t used to women having lots of choice – so we’re still getting used to women having agency to make varied and different decisions.

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The dresses in the show are amazing, outrageous and difficult to move in. They are real dresses that have been worn for weddings or were bought to be worn at a wedding. A normal bridal outfit is very performative. It really is a costume in a performance when you think about it! What’s interesting is that you can look at hundreds of bridal dresses and they don’t look very different from one another. On this specific day society expects a woman to be at her peak in a very particular way. When seeing this, you question whether the scope of what womanhood is supposed to be is still incredibly narrow. What are we emulating and why? If we are now becoming more open to different ideas about womanhood, why isn’t there much movement in this particular aspect?

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What wedding traditions would you get rid of?

Anything that seems like you are doing it because you feel you have to. Oh and the obey bit. Absolutely not cool.

Why is there so much pressure to get married? I’m 33, unmarried (never been interested in getting married), society makes me feel that it is something i should be doing and lush friends often ask “so when are you getting married”…Spoiler alert: probably NEVER….

It still feels like the pinnacle of women’s achievement is marriage. I think sometimes as a society we can still find it difficult to see a woman as having value on her own, not just existing as an extension of her husband/partner. But I also feel that when those questions come they often aren’t ill-meaning – they’re habit. We’re just taught that that is what we are aiming for as women.

At the end of many fairy-tales and movies you find true love and… well, that’s usually the end! We’re able to question so many more of the things that are expected of us now, to have children, to not have children e.t.c. but it is still against the social narrative to choose a different path. I always think that it’s not all that long since we got the vote and we’re still arguing about whether women should have rights, choices, agency…the list goes on. It takes a long time for attitudes to change. Hopefully the question one day will just be, ‘what do you want to do?’

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Previous shows/projects you want to tell me about?

Our last show This Really is Too Much won the Stockholm Fringe Festival GRAND PRIX, the Swedish Festival’s top award and was part of the prestigious Underbelly Untapped award for innovative new writing at the 2017 Edinburgh Fringe.

It combined dancing with dark comedy to delve into a world of farcical stereotypes and preposterous power struggles, wrestling with gender, identity and social convention. This Really Is Too Much was an outlandish and wildly entertaining medley of absurd political speeches, talent contests and box ticking.

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Highlight for 2019 for Gracefool Collective?

Being one of the top 9 moments on the BBC’s Dance Passion Day!

What does it mean to be a feminist in 2019?

Intersectionality and Listening.

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What’s next for Gracefool collective?

Due to our collaborate ethos and non-hierarchical structure, ideas don’t develop fully until we’re first in the studio for a new work, so… we’ve no idea! It will probably become a work that deals with what we are concerned about now.

At the moment we are thinking about how Brexit impacts upon this as internationals working professionally. We’re dealing with loss, grief, trying to find a sense of belonging and whether or not to have children. This work touches on ideas of impending doom and the apocalypse. We’d love to explore this existential crisis further!

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Wow…..I want to join Gracefool Collective….love what their about and the energy is palpable. I love creative folks with real purpose …

So are you going to join me and come and see ‘This Is Not A Wedding ‘ at Arts Centre Washington, Sunderland on 3rd October? You can still get your tickets HERE!