(#AD) An Interview with Workie Ticket Theatre – giving a voice to communities & human stories through theatre making….. #womenwarriors

One of my favourite things about being the Culture Vulture, is that I get to meet people who are truly living and breathing their passion – independent folks making real changes and a big difference to people in the North. Passion and purpose is what gets me out of bed in a morning, and I love to connect with others who connect with theirs.

Workie Ticket Theatre Company is a company of brilliant humans doing just that – they first came to my attached due to the name. As a bit of a “workie ticket” myself – I appreciated their branding……. For that don’t know – a “workie ticket” is a Geordie term for someone who is a bit mischievous, a tinker, someone who pushes the boundaries, pushes their luck……..but in a likeable way. I’m all about pushing boundaries so I really embrace the term and the Workie Ticket ethos.

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Workie Ticket are doing amazing things in the North East– their first project came to my attention on social media. Hear Her Roar, celebrated and gave a platform to brave, bold new writing by some of the North East’s most exciting playwrights. Giving a platform to new talent is something I’m really passionate about and part of my purpose as Culture Vulture so it’s lush to see others championing equitable opportunities. Their current project ‘Women Warriors’ is extremely important and gives voices to the stories of female veterans on stage- stories that haven’t been told, silenced and disempowered – so I was thrilled to be invited over to The Exchange in North Shields to meet JoJo Kirtley founder and co-Artistic director of WT and Lindsay Nicholson, co-Artistic Director of WT. We had some amazing chat about things we’d like to change in the theatre industry in the North East and it was an ace opportunity for a Culture Vulture interview and to find out more about Women Warriors on 9th October at The Exchange at 7pm – tickets are available to purchase HERE.

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Hi JoJo & Lindsay, right so for my reader and fellow Culture Vultures….Who are you?

JoJo Kirtley, founder of WT and co-Artistic director. I write, produce and facilitate. I am originally from Newcastle but I’ve spent a lot of my career in Manchester.

Lindsay Nicholson, Co-Artistic Director of WT. I’m a performer, facilitator and producer.

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Tell me about your journey into theatre?

JoJo– I went to Longbenton High School where I was introduced to drama because of my drama teacher, Ian Williams. He believed in me at a time when I was struggling. I fell in love with Brecht instead of Shakespeare, but I wanted to learn more about how to run a theatre. So, I worked in theatres as an usher, back-stage hand, in the box office and marketing whilst I was at Uni. I studied for my Masters degree in Theatre Studies at Manchester Uni and I then went into youth work and teaching drama to young people excluded from school.

I never saw myself as a writer. Never had that belief in myself. I didn’t write my first play until I was 26, when I was on maternity leave with my son, Tom. I had entered a Royal Exchange competition and later wrote ‘Loaded’ which was produced at 24:7 Theatre Festival. I fell into producing when I was pregnant again with Ry and my pals, Rob and Martin needed a producer to help produce their play, “Away From Home” which I did taking a baby every where with me!

Lindsay – My background is performance. I was in my first musical at the age of 9 – ‘Brigadoon’ – I’ve never been able to stand the sound of Bag Pipes since… After my degree in Performing Arts, I fell out of love with the theatre industry and ended moving into event management and art curation, I enjoyed running a Multi-Purpose Art Space in 2010, moving on to coordinate events at a queer-led art space – both non-profit Pop Ups that aren’t here today but I am immensely thankful for those opportunities that taught me how to deal with floods, minor electrocution and how to zip up a 6-foot-odd, bearded drag queen into a Care Bear dress.

I’ve had the privilege of working and living in some amazing places, teaching Drama one Summer in New York, working on the events team at Melbourne Arts Centre for two years in Australia and a year spent in-between Tokyo and Bali for an events and hospitality company. I realised however I was being pulled back to my original communities and the art of story-telling… I decided to return home and “dip my toe in” the acting world again. JoJo punished me with an 18 minute monologue and since then we have become sound friends and now business partners.

Tell me about Workie Ticket? What is it? How did it start? Inspiration behind it?

JoJo – I had a story I wanted to tell; my story and I wanted to be my own boss, when it came to writing (I am not good with people telling me what to do). I feel like the North East has a very male-dominated theatre industry and there isn’t many opportunities for women.

So, I set my own company up to create those opportunities-first it was just a group of us who primarily to wanted to raise money for Newcastle Women’s Aid and raise awareness about domestic abuse. Then, I realised that I could develop it further but I couldn’t do it on my own so I asked Lindsay to Workie Ticket too. Best thing I ever did!

We’re now a female-led theatre company who want to push boundaries and empower the people we work with through theatre. Essentially, I just want to tell stories that make audiences sit up and listen.

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I got goose bumps hearing that…Tell me about Women Warriors?  

JoJo – I was at a women’s mental health conference and I saw a post it note that read, “What about female veterans?” and I thought…..GOOD question, what about them? It haunted me…how come I had never thought about women who fight for this country?  Eventually, after some research I met up with Paulie from ‘Salute Her’ and we talked about me writing a play but I started to think that these women needed more…so Women Warriors was born…

Women Warriors has been devised by engaging female veterans through forum theatre and discussion-based workshops. We also spoke to a lot of women veterans at groups and meetings. Some rang us up and told us their stories.

Our main aim with WW is to contribute to their empowerment whilst creating a dialogue about how to support veteran rehabilitation through creative methods. We wanted to centre the lived experiences of female veterans, women who are often socially isolated, overlooked and suffering from lack of support in a theatre production but make it real. We also wanted to raise awareness of the challenges female veterans face in society such as prejudice, discrimination, abuse and PTSD but also celebrate these women. We were lucky to be funded by the Newcastle University Social Fund and work with Dr Alice Cree who is writing about our methodology. Other funders for this stage were Hospital of God, Sir James Knott, Greggs Foundation, Rothley Trust and the Joicey Trust.

Within a safe space, we have facilitated issue-based and forum theatre workshops to develop a series of short plays with five writers. We presented a rehearsed reading of our piece in July as part of our R&D in the build up to producing the first full production of ‘Women Warriors’ It was very well received and the veterans loved it; which was the main thing. Two days before the reading, the Arts Council confirmed funding the full productions and I remember thinking, if the veterans don’t like it then I will send the money back! And I would have.

But luckily, they loved it….and one said to me this week that they felt like they could open up more now and talk about their experiences.

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What can audience members going to see Women Warriors on 9th October at The Exchange expect?

JoJo – I don’t think you can really define this production. Expect to be shocked. Expect to cry and laugh. Bring tissues. There are some real moments of heartache which are pretty-hard hitting.

What do you want audiences to take away?

Lindsay – Really quite simply that they will think about female veterans from now. The audience may be more informed in why people sign up to serve. It is not the same for everybody…

JoJo – When we first started working with the veterans, I thought we would struggle to connect but they are an amazing group of women. I hope audiences see that.

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Sum the show up in 3 words?

Lindsay – Bike, dyke, frigid?

Talk me through the process of developing the show up to this point? Who have you worked with?

Lindsay – We made a connection with Charity – Forward Assist to engage with female veterans based around the North and developed a core group of veterans that attended our workshops and…

We knew right away that we would employ practitioner Rosa Stourac McCreery to deliver Forum Theatre Workshops. We see Forum Theatre as a tool for change, it’s an active empowering process – we knew this was the kind of theatre these strong, brave women would be interested in learning about and using. Rosa, also an experienced Director is directing the piece, considering the essence of the female veterans participation at all times.

Dr Alice Cree is an ESRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow in critical military studies and political geography at Newcastle University. Alice contacted us to see if she could follow our process for our research originally, but has become a vital part of our team on this project, advising us, drawing academic attention to our work facilitating collaborations and even helping us win funding bids. She is a real Workie Ticket.

Bridgelight Media – We absolutely love these guys!  A young, female led, media company who create sublime work, and have been great supporters of Workie Ticket.  They created our short documentary which perfectly captures our process and the veteran’s voices.

Great North Museum granted us free rehearsal space when they learned of our project and were a great host for our Rehearsed Reading event. It’s interesting to be able to playact in such a beautiful space with so much weight. It’s pretty rad to know that on the other side of your workshop space there are dinosaurs!

JoJo – Even my sister was involved, Dr Jenna Kirtley as she is a psychologist who specialises in working with veterans. She was there to offer support and advice.

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Tell me about the creative team behind it Women Warriors?

Lindsay – We have employed 4 incredible local playwrights to capture the stories and deliver them into short plays that explore issues the veterans raised in our workshops.

JoJo – Olivia Hannah has written an incredible play about being a mother after years of training as a soldier and the impact that has.  When we first read the play, we both cried.  Juliana Mensah writes about mental health within the military and when I watched it for the first time, I had goose bumps; such a clever piece of writing. Rebecca Glendenning-Laycock- whose piece explores homophobia in the Army has written a play that gives us hope. She worked with one particularly amazing female veteran who rang me out of the blue and said….please tell my story.

Our play is about a group of women who meet in a women’s veteran group and ask the question-what about female veterans? They also like to eat a lot of cake! I have also written all of the interlinking scenes which were the veterans’ real responses to particular questions we asked them questions like what it means to be a “woman warrior”?

Why did you chose The Exchange in North Shields as your venue?

JoJo – When I first started Workie Ticket, nobody knew me and I was finding a lot of closed doors from all the main theatre houses in Newcastle, which is standard. The Exchange was not one of them. Karen and Mike who run the Exchange were lovely and have always made me feel welcome. My sons come with me to a lot of meetings and now, they hang out there and go to their drama club. I genuinely feel like The Exchange is a lush place and I wish they were supported more.

Lindsay – We have a great relationship with The Exchange – they are very supportive. The venue is gorgeous and interesting and great theatre does happen outside the city centre believe it or not…;)

What does it feel like to give voices and opportunities to unheard and often overlooked folks? Why is it so important to you?

JoJo– It’s important because we’re living in a World where we need to speak up and speak out. It’s 2019 and I am still having the same argument about women’s rights as I did twenty years ago. I guess I don’t want to grow old (older…) and wonder why I let so many things happen without saying something.

Lindsay – It is really humbling when people share their stories with you – a great deal of responsibility goes into listening with sensitivity and then holding those stories with great care. It becomes your duty to bring awareness to these people’s experiences or struggles and it can be quite the challenge to make sure you are presenting it with the right respect, clarity and compassion. It’s important to us because it’s our way of fighting, our activism, to make these voices heard and to engage people into listening to them. By hosting and engaging people in these conversations we are on the first step of looking at affecting social change.  Theatre is a great tool for empathy.

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Tell me a bit about the previous project “Hear her Roar”?

JoJo – The HEAR HER ROAR project highlighted Tyneside women’s real stories and raised awareness of women’s issues such as domestic violence, working mothers, abortion, sexual assault and sexuality.

HEAR HER ROAR was our first major project, which celebrated the talents of North East women, collaborated with community groups and charities such as Newcastle Women’s Aid and promoted equality within the theatre industry. HEAR HER ROAR was successfully launched above the Bridge Hotel Pub in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne, on 10th November 2017 as a night of script-in-hand performance of new short plays to give a flavour of our work and to highlight the specific themes.

We sold out.

We developed a network of creatives and we were even featured in The Guardian’s Readers’ Favourite theatre of 2017. I couldn’t believe it! In January 2018, we received funding from the People’s Postcode Lottery and the Catherine Cookson Trust, respectfully to deliver our February to September educational programme which included a full-scale theatre performance of our plays for International Women’s Day at The Exchange in North Shields, on 10th March 2018 and was part of celebrating 100 years of Women’s suffrage.

Again, completely sold out!

We also collaborated with the Red Box Project to collect sanitary products for local schools and collected for Newcastle Women’s Aid. In total, we have raised over £1300 for Newcastle Women’s Aid.

Are you a real life Workie Tickets?

JoJo – Without a doubt. My Grandad Joe used to call me a workie ticket when I argued back with him and that’s where the name came from too. He was a bold man who I adored and a workie ticket himself. I am a trouble maker but for all the right reasons. People need to be challenged.

What does being a feminist in 2019 mean to you?

Lindsay – NECESSARY.

In 2019 I think now the responsibility is educating people about Feminism because there’s too much toxic language and attitudes towards it. Educating people that feminism doesn’t mean the reversal of power, “women taking over” – It’s equal rights, it’s women being safe, being heard.

There’s not any ‘one way’ to be a feminist or define feminism.  You have agency – I think people forget that, when they hear language of feminism, many people and communities do it their way, everyone can be a feminist in their own way. I may not conform to some women’s idea of Feminism but I take responsibility to empower women and I am making that my work. For Workie Ticket it has always been about giving women a voice, levelling out the playing field, pointing out injustices and inequality and advising or indeed leading conversations and actions on how to make a fairer society for everyone.

Sometimes feminism is nurturing my male friends when they have been victims of toxic masculinity and reminding them that they don’t have to be oppressed by or conform to harmful male stereotypes.  Feminism is the pursuit of freedom – for everyone.

JoJo – I have been a feminist since I was 10 years old. Things have only slightly changed and I am now 38. I read recently that Apple originally made Siri to deflect questions about feminism and the #metoo movement. That says it all for me. It’s like the modern day way that women are being silenced and written out of history! So, the fight for equality must go on. Only feminism in 2019 must be intersectional, otherwise, what’s the point?

What’s next for Workie Ticket after this?

Lindsay – We are currently in chats about taking Women Warriors to NATO annual conference in Brussels next year…which is scary and huge but also really necessary for us to speak truth to power. To have the opportunity to be starting to believe your practice could have the power to become Legislative Theatre is just incredible!  We are looking at touring the production and we will be crafting our drama for wellbeing programme so we will get to continue working with loads of other lovely communities.

JoJo – I would like a decent nights’ sleep and a spa break…with some rum.

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Thank you Lindsay and JoJo! YES……it’s so important that independents like Workie Ticket exist. It’s important to the women in the North, the talent in the region, community minded folks and proof that yes indeed, exciting new theatre exist in venues outside of the city centres – in fact some of the best theatre I’ve seen recently, is at venues like The Exchange.

So fellow Culture Vultures, two bits of advice:

  1. Join me, on 9th October at The Exchange for Women Warriors – there are still tickets available to purchase.
  2. Embrace your inner Workie Ticket….we all need to be workie tickets in today’s society to make the changes we want to see.

Over and Out.

Project: WORTH – Lady Kitt, defacing bank notes,gender equality, championing brilliant women & crowdfunding!

So this is a first for my blog…..I’m revisiting an artist I’ve interviewed before…Lady Kitt. When I interviewed her last time it was the very beginning of getting to know her after fangirling from a far. Since then…we’ve met lots of times and I’ve seen her work, one of her performances and fallen in love with her even more. Officially one of my favourite humans.

You can read my last blog post here – find out all about Lady Kitt, her practice and of course Nasty Women North East.

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Now for this post – I’m going Lady Kitt project specific; I’m talking about LK’s project WORTH. And I will let LK tell you in her own words about the project but this post feels timely to me. At the heart of project WORTH is the (rational) human ideal of gender equality. It’s about championing the women who have fought and raised the rest of us up enabling and empowering us politically, professionally, inspirationally and everything in between. It’s also about recognising the areas of work and sectors where women remain under-represented and highlights that we still have some work to do!

So I’ve been incredibly disheartened and surprised that in sharing on my social channels other projects, art and blog posts about gender equality and championing women that I’ve lost audience and received messages from individuals who clearly do not champion gender equality and feminism – and it has reminded me how essential projects like WORTH and how brave people like LK are for putting themselves out there…..

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LK is crowdfunding for project WORTH and it won’t happen with you! It really seriously won’t….we need you to donate. Before we move on to LK – I thought I’d express why I love this project and why I’m donating to it….

It recognises the wonderful humans that fought and enabled some of us to get the vote. I think sometimes we forget how big a deal it was for The Suffragettes to stand up against society and the patriarchy of the time and demand change, to be heard and ensured visibility. We are forever indebted to these women – they enabled us to strive towards the path where women can be anything and anyone they want to be….astronauts, business owners, politicians, playboy bunnies, Britney Spears….

It’s championing women in underrepresented sectors… it’s so important to recognise that there is still work that needs to be done and there are still some sectors where a woman is a lone voice in the room. And I’ve been that lone woman before….

Project WORTH is empowering women – by supporting this project – we are supporting and enabling others! You’re uniting women with a cause and common voice – encouraging them to discover and realise their worth within them….WORTH really speaks to my interests, my motivations as The Culture Vulture (to empower others) and of course, my heart.

So let’s hand over to Lady Kitt to find out more about the project.

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For those that didn’t read my last blog post….. tell me who you are and a bit about you?

Hiya, I’m Kitt. I live in Newcastle and LOVE the North East with a wild passion. I’m an artist, an activist, a Nasty Women, a drag king and a parent to two lush little people. My favourite colour is red and I’m the oldest person I know who likes emojis as much as I do.

You’ve been called “The International Superstar of feminism”…. How the bliddy hell did that feel

😀 😁  😃 😄 😅 😆 😉 😊 😋 😎 😍 😘 😗 😙 😚

It felt a bit like that ^^

It’s a pretty bold statement made by Callum and Alex the lovely folks behind Creative Debuts (CD) London. The local feminist art group that I’m part of, Nasty Women North East, collaborated on a project with CD earlier in the year and from that they invited us to be part of The Anti-Art Fair in London in October. The fair is a celebration of international creativity and a call for greater diversity in the arts. If you’re in London Oct 4th-7th get yourself along!! You can even get a lovely little (33%) Nasty discount by using the discount code NWFRIENDS.

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Nasty Women North East are showcasing a couple of our projects ‘the (small but) FIERCE mag’ – a magazine for children who want to change the world and the adults who support them and the Nasty Women International Art Prize 2018. I’m also one of the artists showing work in the Nasty Women section of the fair, curated by Elijah Wheat Showroom, New York..

Being labelled an International Super of Feminism is totally mega … generally I’m pretty confident about my abilities, you certainly couldn’t call me modest; but when I saw that – blush inducing for sure and anything like that label comes with sense of responsibility. So I feel like I’d better boss the shit out of this feminist ‘art-ing’ now someone’s said that. So LET’S DO IT!

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What’s been your experience as an identifying female in the work place and in the arts?

On an interpersonal level, for me, generally fine, often fantastic. But I have heard dreadful things from other women in the arts. One women I know missed out on a big commission because she had recently got married and the commissioners assumed that she was going to have children (which she wasn’t) and assumed that by having children she would no longer be able to take on work- rubbish!!

On a more general level- fucking dreadful. It’s been relatively well reported in national media in the last year or so, that there is a woeful lack of female artists in public collections. Not just lack of women but the general lack of diversity is mind bogglingly bad. Many institutions are addressing this, but it’s a slow old slog.

It’s not just changing the attitudes to collecting but also changing the way that existing collections shown, interpreted and cared for. With a few exceptions the lack of women in senior roles in museums, galleries, within funding bodies, educational institutions etc, really effects all this. Also, the prices women artists can expect for their work is considerable less than for male artists. There tends to be poor provision for parents in the Arts. Residencies, especially rarely offer provision / support for artist with caring responsibilities. I could go on and on and on…

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So today we are chatting about your project: WORTH…. Can you tell me about the project? What’s it about? What was the inspiration?

It started early last year! Our children have some great books celebrating amazing women in history- which are absolutely lush, however a lot of these women are dead or super-duper famous. So I thought I’d like to teach my children about women who I personally think are amazing – but aren’t necessarily as well known.  I was inspired by Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign to have more women represented on Bank of England issue bank notes – so I’ve celebrated these women and created portraits – papercutting the faces of several local women like MP Chi Onwurah and drag artist Venus Di Milo onto various currency notes. I’ve also included some completely astonishing children who are already awesome campaigners and activists.

Bank Of England Unveils Jane Austen Ten Pound Note

Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign led to Jane Austen appearing on the above £10 note

Finding out about all these people has been so inspiring- it makes me feel good about the world. It’s also, connected to the centenary of (some) women’s right to vote in the UK- it pulls together a lot of things I’m interested in. But, you know the more I think about it, the more I realise it’s a bit of love letter really to these women I admire and to my children. I want to show them everyone has the ability to make the world a better place and to do things that they believe in- age, gender, all sorts of other stuff might get in your way, but it doesn’t have to stop you.

Projects like this are essential to celebrate how far we’ve come and highlight areas that need to be worked on – you’re a creative change maker! Where do you think women are the most underrepresented?

In the UK it’s in STEM for sure. One of my WORTH portraits is of Prof Charlotte Roberts, Archaeology professor at Durham University; for me she is a great example of a women who has approached work in STEM and in academia in a really unusual and interesting way- she actually started her career as a nurse. If you have a chance – look her up I would really recommend it; she has done some great interviews and is really fun and engaging about her subject.

Over the last 10 years I done several of collaborations with scientists (many of the women) and have heard first-hand accounts of gender discrimination within STEM workplaces. This prompted me to start researching about women in STEM, which is quite depressing. According to Wise Campaign statistics, in the UK in 2017 only 23% of the STEM workforce identified as female. But there are some fantastic people and organisations working to change this. For anyone interested in this the Athena SWAN awards and charter is a great place to start.

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You have and will immortalise some amazing women by papercutting their portraits out of currency notes……but why use paper currency and paper cutting as the medium?

A loooong time ago- before I studied art, I used to make stencils for spray painted work. I made thousands of them! And then I started to look at the stencils and think “these are quite interesting object in themselves”. I didn’t really do anything with it for ages, until my sister commissioned me to create some artwork for an album by her then band (Bridie Jackson and the Arbour).

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Album cover

Initially the idea was to create a spray painted work, but as it developed into a paper cut and that was the first time I really made a finished work that was a paper cut. I love the simplicity of the process, I love that it’s pretty eco-friendly, I love that it’s so fragile…. The practice is largely considered to be a craft, it’s something that has a long history of being made in a domestic setting, often by women, from old newspapers etc – Beamish Museum has some great example of some of these for anyone who, like me, is a paper nerd.

It’s a pretty performative art form- As much of my practice is performance based that appeals to me hugely- Hans Christen Anderson used to tell stories and make paper cuts at the same time- by the end of the story he would present the listeners with a paper cut character from the tale! I just love it.

Cutting up money started with wanting to create a response to Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign. I made the first piece in 2017, which is of Malala Yousifazi. I showed it at the 1st UK Nasty Women exhibition and it was really well received and then brought by a collector in Amsterdam. That experience just made me want to do more. Also, cutting up money is very fun- physically fun because it’s thin but strong and smooth which is great for very intricate paper cuts and it feels a tad anarchic!

I’d been doing the series for over a year before I realized that there is quite a community of money defacing artists round the world! I started following a few on Instagram and then the fantastic Bob Osborne (Rebel not Taken) approached me to be in a book of defaced banknote art and an exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery; since then I’ve met loads of fellow money artists – it’s great!

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Elements of WORTH is featured in the book Cash is King – available in The Saatchi Gallery, London; can you tell me how this came about? It’s totally brilliant!

Via Instagram.

There are loads of shit things about Instagram- I could write a book about those; but there are also very good things. Being able to directly connect with people all over the world who share a very specific interest or a passion with you is one.

I used the hashtag #feministdefacedbanknoteart And that’s how it happened…

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You’re crowdfunding for this project…. Tell me why should people support the project and donate?

The feedback I’ve had from supporters of the project so far is that they are excited to be part of a project that reflects their political believes, supports a local artist and is celebratory. People have been extremely generous and some have told me what they would have used the money for if not for the project- which is really interesting (everything from designer socks, to gig tickets, packets of fags and a months’ worth of “posh” cleaning products!!). This project has already had many successes and looks set to have more- I think it’s fun for people to be able to say- “I helped make that project happen“. Which is absolutely true- despite having sold work from the series I have completely run out of money to move the project forward- it’s pretty expensive coz- you know I’m cutting up 50 quid notes … every time someone donates I get closer to creating the next work in the series, that’s vital for me and exciting for supporters.

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So now on to the mega important question; how do people donate to support project: WORTH?

Through my Just Giving page

If WORTH is successfully funded – what will it enable you to do?

It will enable me to make, exhibit and promote the whole series of 13 planned works. I will also run a workshop on how to create a successful gender equality project like Caroline Criado-Perez’s project.

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You’ve got loads of brilliant rewards if people support the crowdfunding campaign – can you tell me a bit about them?

Aww thank you- I’m glad you like them! I think it’s really important to offer something back to people who have supported the project. Any amount up to £25- I invite people pop into my studio (in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) and pick something from my portfolio of sketches, practice pieces and unfinished beauties; they tend to be A4. £25 will get you one of my $1 skull cuts, entitled “So many ways I love you”; each one is made by cutting between 30-80 love heart shapes from a $1dollar bill.

The pieces are backed with black card and accompanied by a small glass vial filled with the cut out hearts! I also keep making odd different dollar cuts like a zebra or a butterfly- keep an eye on my social if you want to see what I come up with next…..

£70 will get you a bespoke portrait (created by cutting hearts from a single sheet of papyrus) of a subject of your choice.

£100 a 2.5 hr paper cutting workshop at my house or studio for 2-6 people

£300 one of the Worth pieces once the exhibition is finished

Apart from the workshop, these are all super reduced prices for the work and are only available through the Just Giving campaign! I am also, open to suggestions so if there’s something someone wants and they think I might be able to do it- they should just get in touch!

Are you going to have a project launch party if the funding is successful?

YES!!! I love a party and I especially love a feminist art party. On Fri Nov 2nd 7-10 pm at the glorious PRAXIS Gallery in Commercial Union house in Newcastle I will be unveiling the completed series; there will be interactive art, music, performances, and FREE drinks. Everyone is welcome.

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What was the moment you realised your ‘WORTH’ as a woman? And also as an artist?

There are so many answers to this question- it’s a constant evolution. I’m generally pretty confident, but there are certainly been times where I’ve questioned myself especially when our children where very little. Not exactly my WORTH, but thought am I doing enough? Am I looking outwards enough or I’m I just getting a bit insular And nest-y?!

Getting involved in Nasty Women was part of the answer to those questions. I guess I was thinking- being a “good parent” isn’t just about looking out for the children’s immediate needs- it’s about looking at the world more widely and thinking what could do with changing- what battles have I had that I don’t want my children to have, or at least I don’t want them to have those battles feeling unsupported.

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WORTH celebrates some women getting the vote…. How do you feel about the Suffragette movement? I sometimes feel like there is another wave happening right now – people like me and you as the rebels pushing and championing…..

I think some of the utter drivel that we still have to put up with even now irrespective of the things we campaign for is terrible – And that’s now, in the 21st century, where we are supported by people all over the world, where there are feminist politicians, policy makers and police officers. We have so many rights and come from such a base of strength in many ways. And it’s STILL hard as fuck.

I just can’t even imagine how complex it must have been for people involved in the suffragette movement back in the 1900s. Having said all that, I’m still very uncomfortable with the acts of destruction and violence that some campaigners carried out. Also the Suffragettes were a women only organisation- not my sort of thing. I think things will be fairer and better by everyone having a stake in the change and through cooperation; not be excluding certain groups. But then there are also things about the Suffragists which I find complicated- it was largely a very middle class organisation, focussed on parliamentary activity which restricted it to people who lived near London / who could write / afford to send letters. I know I can’t possibly understand the circumstance of those women and how desperate they were for change, but I always want to try and find ways of creating change in peaceful and cooperative ways. Having said that I’m the one who’s chopping up 100s of pounds worth of perfectly legal, useful money to make a point, so what do I know…

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Do you a role model/inspiration?

Soo, so many- that’s what WORTH is all about!! This could be a loooong list, but some people who really inspire me at the moment: My amazing sister Bridie Jackson, Nasty Women North East co- founders Michaela Wetherell and Aly Smith, one of my WORTH subjects Francesca Di Giorgio, long term chum and male Nasty Woman David Wright and You.

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Ohhh being one of your inspirations…. Now that is a BIG compliment and you’re one of mine. How would you describe a modern day feminist in 2018?

Me! You! Anyone (any gender, age, background- no Limits) who believes in gender equality.

Project: WORTH in 2019 is….?

Aaaaahhhh exciting- sooo many plans and amazing opportunities. I can’t say much specific at the moment, but WORTH is going International.

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Well that sounds flipping exciting….. and sounds like I will be doing another Lady Kitt blog post in 2019!

So please donate to Project: WORTH – if any of the above has hit a cord and lit a fire in your belly – please donate. Only you can make this amazing project happen! You can donate HERE!

Very soon I will be doing some live social media from INSIDE Lady Kitt’s studio (8th October) – I will be going behind the scenes of Project: WORTH in action!

You can also find out more about and meet Lady Kitt by booking on to her Paper Cutting workshop in Gateshead on 11th October! It’s 12 per ticket, you’ll be using Project: WORTH as inspiration for your papercutting and you will also be able to donate to WORTH during the workshop.

And that’s all for now Culture Vultures!

p.s. DONATE!