Interview with Linzi, pompom maker extraordinaire over at The Pompomporium

I am loving the trend for Maximalist Interiors and fashion – it’s always been my personality and vibe. I like clashy, bright, bold and creatively chaotic. It makes me feel like me, in the sense of self expression, it satisfies my need for sensory stimulation and gives me a good old shot of dopamine. I purchased a neon pom pom star a good few years ago, originally for Christmas, but I’ve had it hanging up now everyday since then and it just is one of my favourite singles in the whole world. I bliddy love a pompom.

I tried to make one at The Crafthood’s social, a few years back and let me tell you, it is hard than it looks but is also an addictive craft. My pompom got an A for effort, but a D for neatness. But at least it made myself and everyone laugh at the workshop and Sebastian (my cat) gained a new cat toy he loved (for a short period – fickle gent!).

My love of colour, maximalist vibes and pompoms led me to find The Pompomporium on Instagram – anyone who is as in love with pompoms as I will already know Linzi and her gorgeous business, but for those who don’t – she’s a pompom maker extraordinaire!

Image of a Pompom bouquet made by The Pompomporium

Linzi is smashing it out of the park growing a creative business that works for her and her family; I wanted to celebrate and showcase that. Building a business and being self-employed, has the benefit of being built around the individual, set your own boundaries, your own work pattern, your own working style, which can enable a creative thrive, flourish and simply exist.

I had the pleasure of meeting her at Make & Mend Festival 2021 and I thought I’d follow up with a little Culture Vulture interview, to satisfy and shout about my pompom love and so you can all get to know Linzi a little better.

So first Culture Vulture interview of 2022…. Over to you Linzi!

Image of colourful Pom pom earrings made by The Pompomporium.

First up, who are you?

Hiya! I’m Linzi, I’m 32, have two kiddos and run my business from my home in NE England.

Lush, so what’s your business?

It’s called The Pompomporium (which just gets more fun to say after a couple of drinks) and I make bright, bold homewares and jewellery, almost always involving pom poms.

Image of Linzi – The Pompomporium.

How did it all start?

I think I’ve always classed myself as a crafty person, but I didn’t become a maker until after I was medically retired back in Spring 2018. Prior to that I was a secondary school English teacher, and whether it was lesson plans, wall displays or cunning schemes to make the kids actually care about what some dead white guys had to say – I was definitely creative! I loved my job, it was definitely a vocation, and to lose it overnight could have broken me. I knew I needed something new to keep me busy, but that would fit in around my variable health needs and left me energy for being a parent.

Image of colourful Pom pom stuffed into a letter R made by The Pompomporium.

And the big question….why pompoms?

That’s where pom poms came into it. I had made my first ever wreath a few years before 2018; a Wonder Woman themed wall hanging for my daughter’s fourth birthday. Poms are this excellent juxtaposition of being really mindful in the making but full of excitement and joy once they’re made; I love that. I know they’re a bit silly, but honestly the world is dead hard sometimes and I think we all deserve something silly!

Image of colourful Pom pom in letter T shape made by The Pompomporium.

I made an infamous pompom that is now my cat’s favourite little toy – it was not neat AT ALL like yours, how do you get yours so beautifully and juicily round?

I have two top tips for pom pom making so grab your pens!

Firstly, wrap tight. I use DK acrylic yarns (my favourite are Paintbox and Stylecraft) and know that your pom maker can take plenty of wrapping. The tighter you wrap, the denser your pom pom will be.

Secondly, you need decent scissors. An embroidery pair is always a great shout but if you’re making to sell, I’d also recommend a pair of fiskars. These fluffy little spheres take more trimming than you would think; it will save your hands if you have sharp tools.

Image of Pom pom bouquet being made by The Pompomporium.

How long do your pompoms take to make?

This is tough to answer because a teeny one that I’ll use in jewellery might only take ten minutes, but a very large, patterned pom – such as leopard print or floral – takes much more time, closer to 45 minutes.

Image of colourful Pom pom flower earrings made by The Pompomporium.

I’m a huge fan of your homewares – especially your wreaths – I like quirky, colourful, patterned and bold pieces around me. Do you plan those types of pieces?

Thank you so much! I do plan, I make terrible sketches that rarely see the light of day but they help me keep my messy ADHD brain in check. I’m a big fan of maximalism and more is more, I definitely think that comes across in my work, and I get lots of inspiration from things I love and the things my kids love! The rainbow wreath, for example, was first made for my bright loving son.

Image of colourful Pom pom wreath made by The Pompomporium – next to a fox stuffed animal.

Maximalism all the way! Can you share three other makers or creative Instagrammers that inspire you?

I love @imakestagram, @shittycraftclub & @fatpompoms ✨

So, what products do you sell and where can people purchase?

I will put a pom pom on just about anything to be honest. I make wreaths, banners, bouquets, fairy lights, garlands, hair clips, headbands, earrings, necklaces… I’m certainly missing things out! I sell via Etsy, And So To Shop, Not on the High Street and my own website – www.thepompomporium.com

Image of a bouquet of pompoms made by The Pompomporium.

I know 2021 was a challenge for most creatives, but do you have a highlight that you’d like to share?

People have really responded to the things I make and that feels like proper magic. My Christmas collection in particular was so well received; I love that I get to be part of a family’s traditions in some small way.

Image of colourful Pom pom flower earrings made by The Pompomporium.

And for realness, a low point?

My low points are almost always health related. I really love this little business I’ve created and I hate to feel like I’m letting someone down because I’m having a flare up or a hospital stay. I do genuinely have the most understanding and kind customers though; I very rarely have anyone upset because of it.

Image of Linzi working in her creative space.

You’re a disabled maker – Can you tell us a bit about that?

I’m just going to preface this by saying the disabled community is a beautiful thing. You’ll find many, many chronically ill and disabled makers in small biz land because we don’t fit into a mainstream working environment, in the same way that queer creators, parents working around their kids, Black and brown makers who aren’t appreciated in their fields and many other marginalised groups find a home amongst other creatives. So, yes, it can be tough to work from bed with tremors in my hands and having to stop for a nap after every couple of poms, but it’s very worth it for the myriad of ways I’ve been able to learn from those people.

Image of colourful Pom pom hairclips made by The Pompomporium.

If there was one thing, that if you could, you’d change in the creative sector immediately to make it more accessible and inclusive, what would it be?

No more craft fairs in inaccessible buildings please.

Where the magic happens…..Image of Linzi’s making space & office.

Any advice to share with aspiring disabled makers and artists?

You don’t have to hustle constantly, resting is productive, lean on your people and always write down your suppliers.

Image of colourful Spring wreath made by The Pompomporium.

Do you have an upcoming project or collection that you can tell me about?

I have many a plan for this year! I’m mid-design on some pom pommed bunny ears for Easter. I also have a small homeware collection, including cushions with pom pom corners and tassel mirrors, coming later this year.

Image of colourful Pom pom headband made by The Pompomporium.

Do you have a creative or business aspiration for 2022?

Does survival count? Honestly though, this pandemic has been brutal on all of us, and it’s made me realise that my business needs to make me happy – I’ll be making and designing things that I genuinely love and if they sell then that’s excellent, too.

Image of “you are my sunshine” wreath made by The Pompomporium.

Thank you Linzi!

You’re such a gem and readers, please check out The Pompomporium via: www.thepompomporium.com // @thepompomporium – you won’t regret it – perfect accessories, gifts and homey loveliness. I am now thoroughly convinced that I need a full-blown pompom coat – sounds like an essential item for this gal! Or a shift dress? OR BOTH! I want to be adorned in these furry little colourful beauties!

Until next time, Culture Vultures!

Interview with Olga Prinku artist, maker and creator of the craft of flowers-on-tulle embroidery

I’m always curiously envious of people and artists with attention to detail and patience as attributes within their work. My process brain with some concentration can be like that (to a point), but my creative brain loves the whirlwind of mess, freedom and all things abstract. I’ve never been able to make and create pretty things which when I was more of a perfectionist, used to drive me crackers but now, I have too much fun in the process of creating and bless the mess!

But I still envy the ability to create pretty and precise pieces of art work. And if I was thinking of an artists, that embodies pretty and precise, then Olga Prinku is just that. Olga is an incredible artist, that has become famous for her flowers-on-tulle embroidery; she uses natural materials and flowers to create gorgeous 3D embroidery pieces stitching flowers into the work. Olga’s pieces are magical, thoughtful, makes you smile, and the time, effort and care put into her work is obvious.

Olga Prinku’s work

I saw one of Olga’s collars in a magazine a few months ago. Yes, she does flowers-on-tulle embroidery on clothes too – they look amazing – but more on that later! And from there it was devouring Olga’s Instagram which is a little piece of digital heaven. So, I was delighted when I found out that the folx at Make & Mend Festival 2021, were working with her and exhibiting her work, so I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know her a little and they say, never meet your heroes, well, Olga is just the nicest human. I love it when good people, do well!

Olga Prinku’s work

So of course, you know what’s coming next – I HAD to interview her, and this is a lush interview – so get ready to fall in love with Olga and her work.

Hi Olga, so for my fellow Culture Vultures, let’s start with an intro!

Hi, I’m Olga Prinku – I’m an artist, maker and creator of the craft of flowers-on-tulle embroidery. I’m originally from the Republic of Moldova and I now live in North Yorkshire.

Olga Prinku

Tell us about your journey into creative industries and the arts?

I did a degree in graphic design as a mature student, then I worked on branding for a small design agency and layouts for an interior’s magazine. I’ve always been interested in making, and during my degree I took classes in everything I could find, from screen printing to upholstery.

When I took a career break to start a family, I learned how to knit and I started to sell chunky woollen Christmas stockings on Etsy. I set up an Instagram account originally to promote those stockings, which I would style with Christmas decorations such as home-made wreaths. The craft of flowers-on-tulle embroidery grew out of that hobby of wreath-making.

Olga Prinku’s work

Why is creativity important to you?

I find it incredibly satisfying to come up with an idea that I don’t know if I’ll be able to realise, and then to experiment and tinker until either I have to give up on the idea or I achieve it in a way I’m happy with. It’s great to produce something that’s pleasing to look at, but it’s the creative process of trial and error that really attracts me.

Olga Prinku’s work

For those that don’t know or just indulge me, what is “flowers-on-tulle embroidery”?

It’s embroidery using nature as my thread. I use stretched tulle fabric just like traditional embroidery, but instead of conventional thread I embroider with dried and preserved natural materials such as flowers, grasses, berries, leaves and seed heads.

Olga Prinku’s work

How did you get into it – what was the beginning or the spark?

One day I was using a garden sieve – the kind you use to get stones out of soil – as a frame to make a wreath, tucking some branches into the metal grid to hold them in place. It occurred to me that I could do the same with flowers and tulle fabric. I started posting pictures of my experiments on my Instagram account, and to my surprise and delight they really became popular.

Olga Prinku’s work

For folx new to this craft or curious, what would your advice be?

It’s a great craft to get into if you’re looking for a way to slow down and centre yourself. Dried flowers are delicate and it’s easy to break them if you’re trying to rush or you’re not entirely in the moment. That’s frustrating initially but it’s also an invitation to take some deep breaths and be patient, and then I find I can enter a state of flow when hours go by without me noticing.

Olga Prinku’s work

It looks like a mindful craft and even to look at – your pieces are calming. Now onto something not so calming, social media – you have a HUGE Instagram audience – how does that feel?

It’s not something I ever imagined happening to me, and I’m very grateful to the Instagram community for guiding me on my creative journey. I find it hard to imagine that my flowers-on-tulle embroidery could have taken off like it did if it hadn’t been for Instagram, because the positive feedback on my early experimental posts gave me encouragement and seeing which posts did better than others helped to guide me on where I should focus my next experiments.

There’s always a danger that you get too sucked into Instagram and it starts to take over too much of your time. But it has definitely opened a lot of doors for me, for example, collaborations with fashion brands and having my work displayed in galleries.

Olga Prinku’s work

I like that Instagram has the power of democratising opportunity! So let’s chat Make & Mend Festival, what was your contribution to Make & Mend Festival 2021?

I brought some of my favourite works to display – I started out doing freestyle designs in embroidery hoops, and since then I’ve also done more formal compositions in canvas stretcher frames, so a combination of different pieces displayed.

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

What’s it like people see your work at events and in exhibitions?

I’m always very nervous about meeting people in person! But it’s great to be able to talk to people who are encountering the craft of flowers-on-tulle for the first time, because then it’s Iike I can get to see what I do through fresh eyes.

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

What do you hope people take from your work when they view it or see it?

I hope people see it as a way to combine creativity with reconnecting with nature. Developing the craft of embroidering with natural materials has really opened my eyes to aspects of the natural world that I had previously overlooked. For example, appreciating the beauty of some flowers that would usually be considered as weeds, or seed heads that I previously wouldn’t even have seen as I would have deadheaded the flowers before they could develop.

I forage for some of the materials I use in my work, and on my country walks I’ve become much more attuned to the changing of the seasons, noticing what grows where and when.

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

Can you tell me about your fashion collabs? I want one of your collars!?

Ever since I came up with the idea of embroidering using dried flowers, I’ve been fascinated by the idea of making wearable items. One of the step-by-step projects in my book is creating a Peter Pan collar with preserved flowers. Of course, the challenge is that the flowers are delicate and not resistant to water, which means you have to be very careful when wearing it and check out the weather conditions J.

I also enjoy collaborating with fashion companies to translate the design ideas into traditional embroidery using thread. I’ve designed a range of shirts with my friend Ruth Eaton, and there’s a new collection just coming out with the Canadian menswear brand 3PARADIS – I was taken aback to log into Instagram not long ago to see Justin Bieber wearing a jacket with my design!

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

Your work was featured by Kirstie’s Handmade Christmas – can you tell me a little about that?

One of the ways you can use a dried flower embroidery hoop is as a creative topper for a gift. A couple of years ago Kirstie’s Handmade Christmas came to my home to film me making a hoop, which they then took back to the studio. It was my first experience of being on TV and it was fascinating to learn how it all works.

I understand that the episode I was in will be repeated this year. There’s also a Christmas-themed project in my book, using flowers-on-tulle techniques to create a tree decoration.

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

You mentioned your book – tell us about it? Where and when can folx purchase it?

It’s called Dried Flower Embroidery: An introduction to the art of flowers on tulle, and it’s published by Quadrille. Due to shipping delays the publication date has been pushed back to September 30. But it’s available for pre-order right now in all good bookshops!

Olga Prinku’s work at Make & Mend Festival 2021 – photo credit Clare Bowes.

And what’s next for you?

I’ve just finished filming an online tutorial with the craft platform Domestika, which should be available soon. And I’m finalising a limited initial edition of kits, which contain all the materials you need to make a floral embroidery design in a hoop, together with step-by-step instructions. So I’m excited to be launching that.

I’m hoping to get back into in-person workshops, too, if the pandemic recedes. I’d been planning a week-long workshop retreat in Tuscany which I was almost ready to announce just as the first lockdown hit. I hope that gets to happen at some stage!

Olga Prinku’s work

Oh that sounds so lovely! How can people keep in touch with you?

I’m @olgaprinku on Instagram, and my website is prinku.com. The best way to keep in touch with me is through my email newsletter, which you can sign up to on my website.

Olga Prinku’s work

I really recommend checking out Olga’s work and take some time to appreciate the sheer beauty and skill that goes into each piece. It was just breath taking to Hey, may be one day – I will own an original Olga wearable piece – if I ever went to the Met Gala, I’d absolutely ask Olga to design my outfit.

Interview with visual artist Bethan Maddocks – paper rainforests, creative anarchy & being a nosy parker.

I’m so excited to share this Culture Vulture interview with you all – this interview is with brilliant, Newcastle based visual artist, Bethan Maddocks.

Bethan was actually one of the first artists, I became fascinated with before the Culture Vulture was even a sparkle of an idea in my eye. She’s a multi-disciplinary artist that works with different types of materials – in fact, I’m pretty sure, if you look up multi-disciplinary artist, you’ll see a picture of Bethan smiling back at you. I found it so inspiring when I was first starting out, to see a fellow creative, confidently working across lots of different types of projects and refusing to sit neatly into a box – Bethan to me was an artist that represented creative possibility, opportunity and the beauty of constantly evolving and growing through projects and collaborating with people.

Her work, projects and sculptures bring to life people’s stories and her own ideas, into technically brilliant, unique visual interpretations. They are often socially engaged too – which in present times, is not only crucially important, it also shows that art has a really powerful role to play, reinterpreting and reframing thoughts, ideas, history and can often enable audiences to see and consider things in a different way.  

Bethan was one of the first artists, that I noted co-creating art with communities in such an inclusive, warm, participatory way and I witnessed, the joy of folx seeing their contributions become a final professional artwork or sculpture! Participatory arts in the community, in my opinion, outside of the art world, isn’t really understood and massively undervalued. Bethan was my first real exposure to not only the positive impact of a participatory arts project but also, that the art work created can end up displayed at a professional exhibition or light art event.

I’ve always been a little star struck by Bethan too, a little bit in awe of her. If you know me – you know, I’m not detail focused, I’m not precise, I’m creatively chaotic and methodical process just isn’t a natural thing for me. Bethan’s work is often so delicate, so precise, made from paper, all about the small touches and detail – she probably represents my polar opposite type of creative! I admire her technical brilliance so much – she creates type of work that I look at in total awe, as she’s so highly skilled, accomplished and brilliant.

So this artist interview has been on my “NEED to interview” list pretty much, since I started out as Culture Vulture. And across the years, our paths have crossed many times and I’ve been lucky enough to support a few projects she’s worked on over the years. She’s an absolute North East gem and a really lovely, kind, open human.

Over to you Bethan!

Visual artist Bethan Maddocks

Hello Bethan, can you introduce yourself and tell my fellow Culture Vultures a bit about your practice? 

Hello! I’m a visual artist; I work with light, paper, fabric and found objects to make large sculptures and installations that audiences can touch, explore or add to. The last few years I’ve become really interested in paper-based work so currently I make lots of intricate paper-cuts.

I often work with archives, communities and organisations to collect stories and make socially engaged, political or site-specific artwork.

Bethan Maddock’s piece – From Junipers Branches Grow

I ask every artist I interview this question; can you tell us about your journey into the creative industries? 

Ever since I was little, my twin sister Catriona and I, were always scavenging things for ‘projects’; bottle tops or bits of scrap metal from outside the tiny blacksmiths in our village. Haberdasheries and DIY stores were our treasure troves. I’m grateful that I’ve always been encouraged in playing, exploring and creating since I was a little kid; probably one of the reasons that workshops and community sharing are such a core part of my practice nowadays.

I studied art at college, then Northumbria University and also at a Finnish University for an Erasmus Exchange. After graduating I volunteered on every creative project I could find, till I started getting small projects myself – I think it was easier for recent graduates in the last years of the Labour government as there was more support for young artists and a greater all-round appreciation and understanding of the arts from those in power.

Bethan Maddocks – Floraphone – Photocredit: Colin Rose

Huge congratulations on being awarded the Dover Prize – so excited for you! Can you tell us about the Dover Prize?

I was really lucky (and completely blown away!) to win The Dover Prize in 2019. It’s an amazing £10,000 bursary awarded every two years to a UK-based artist. Its aim is to help artists develop their practice and  comes with the gorgeous ethos to ‘provide the artist with time to think, research, reflect and experiment with new ideas’.

As an artist you’re always applying for things, seeking ways to make your work fit a commission proposal; what’s brilliant about the Dover Prize is that it’s centered around the artist’s own work- the initial application form asks useful questions about your practice and your aims – things I found helpful to reflect on.

In February 2019 I was shortlisted from over 100 applicants and invited for an interview where I got to meet the judges and discuss my work and practice in person. The judges were great, and again asked really helpful questions about my aspirations and inspirations (I even somehow managed to talk about meeting my favourite artist Louise Bourgeois as a wide-eyed 20 year old. I’d like to think Louise was looking down, helping me to win -a sort of artist fairy-godmother!).

The Dover Prize 2021 is now open (deadline February 14th!) and I’d hugely encourage any artist to have a punt at it – it’s been incredible support for the last 2 years. You can apply HERE.

Bethan Maddocks

Can you tell me a bit about what you’ve done with the award these last 2 years?

The Dover Award originates in Darlington; having grown up in County Durham it felt great to focus my practice on a part of the world where I began my journey as an artist. I’ve spent a lot of time exploring the history of the area and trying to connect its historic backstory with contemporary politics. Darlington’s schools, libraries and social infrastructures were massively developed by several powerful Quaker families in the 18th century, so I connected with the local Quaker chapter to learn about their ethos of listening, equality and stewardship to help ground some research. Sitting in silence with a group full of kind strangers, waiting for ‘ministry’ is quite something!

I also used the bursary to help fund a residency to the incredible Studio Garonne in Southern France, where I collaborated with designer Remi Bec to make a series of paper and light sculptures and drawings and I also embarked on a research project to Canada to meet some brilliant paper artists such as Crissy Arseneau, Rachel Ashe and  Brangwynne Purcell. I’ve made lots of experiments combining my papercutting work with machine cut elements, and I’m hoping to translate some papercuts into metal this year.

Bethan Maddocks – Book of Shadows

Can you tell me a bit about your relationship with Woodhorn Museum in Northumberland?

I’ve worked with Woodhorn Museum on and off for the last few years often creating large installations in their huge, ex-mining industry buildings. A lot of my work is about exploring hidden stories, and Woodhorn has a great ethos for uncovering Northumberland’s lesser-known stories – so we’ve collaborated together on some really fun projects.

The Programming team often invites me in, to create installations based on brilliant random ideas they’ve had for exhibitions such as ancient forests, homing pigeons and orchid growing!

Even in 2020 they managed to commission a new project for myself and Unfolding Theatre (as well as the ever-brilliant Ruth Johnson, Nick John Williams and Jill Bennison). The Quest of Missing Questions was Woodhorn’s invitation to its audience for its re-opening after the first lockdown. The commission personally was a bit of a life saver, showing me that good organisations can (and should!) support freelancers even in tough times and in doing so create lovely rich collaborations.

Woodhorn Museum

Here, here! You’ve worked with them a few times in the past? Tell me about one of those projects? 

One of my favourite pieces was The Fallen Forest that explored the prehistoric carboniferous forests that existed here 250 million years ago, which formed the coal so key to our region’s economic and socialist development. I spent several months researching fossil records, becoming my own pretend geologist. I did a residency over in Borneo and managed to connect the kind of foliage that you find in modern Asian rainforests with similar foliage from these ancient rainforests. I created giant ferns and cycads and huge 5 metre tall papercut trees- each paper-tree’s surface referencing the bark patternations that you find recorded in fossils.

It was open for 9 months and the audience could attend workshops to make small paper artworks to add to the forest, so that it grew, expanded and then collapsed; mirroring the ancient forests growth and demise.

I love projects like that; I get to obsess and learn so much about random things. I’m always dreaming that one day I’ll go to a (very specific!) pub quiz and know all the answers from all the avid research I do (it has not happened yet!)

Bethan Maddocks – Fallen Forest

A lot of your work involves engaging with communities and community contributions – why are community contributions important to your practice? Why are opportunities to contribute to creative projects important?  

I’m a huge champion of creativity for so many reasons – it’s the great unifier; when you get a group of people making artwork alongside each other there will always be brilliant, eye opening, heart expanding conversations. There’s some magic that happens when people use their hands to make; it sort of frees up their thinking and people reconnect with their inner child.

I love working with other people as it’s always a helpful side-step for my thinking, I can have the best laid plans for what I want to create for an exhibition, and then a conversation or even a throwaway comment from someone, plants these delicious seeds, and sends me in ways I’d never of thought of. It’s an honour to work alongside people from such diverse backgrounds – there’s always so much to learn from other people.

Bethan Maddocks – NHS Celebration Artwork

You often create sculptures/artwork to scale – what is your favourite thing about that type of work? Do you enjoy watching folx take it in?  

When I go to exhibitions, it’s alwayslarge-scale sculptures and installations that I love to see and experience the most; that sense of becoming aware of your own scale – a little like standing at the top of a massive mountain and feeling so tiny in this all-encompassing landscape.

I also love making loud noises in quiet acoustic buildings, touching stuff that maybe you shouldn’t, opening drawers, prodding around, and I want to make artwork that encourages that, where you can be a playful nosy parker! I made an installation a couple of years ago, where there were hundreds of sandcastles inside a tent, all decorated with cocktail umbrellas. We opened the tent and loads of kids came in, all wanting to smash them down but thinking they ‘weren’t allowed’. Watching the first kid (my nephew- ever a proud Auntie!) go and kick one down and then all the other children running forward to join in; it was just absolutely gleeful to see all that work disappearing in joyful, anarchic seconds. I want to create moments like that.

Bethan Maddocks – Everything There Ever Was

What is your role at BALTIC? Have you been involved in any of their online creative work during lock down? 

I’ve worked freelance for the Learning Team at Baltic for about 12 years; they took a punt on me as a relatively inexperienced but eager workshop facilitator just after I graduated and I’ve been working there ad-hoc ever since. I love the range of groups that we get to work alongside and the Learning team’s encouragement to try out new stuff, take over spaces and explore the exhibitions. They were also brilliant at the beginning of 2020 madness (we’ve got to champion the good ones!), paying all freelancers for sessions they couldn’t deliver, and helping support us to do online workshops. I’ve made quite a few online videos since, and it’s a learning curve, but I spent a lot of my childhood apparently critiquing Neil Buchanan for his crafting on Art Attack, so perhaps it was meant to be. You can watch them here and here and here

Bethan Maddocks – Floraphone

How has lock down/pandemic affected you as an artist/freelancer?  

Well it hasn’t been easy for anyone has it (except perhaps for political donators and disaster capitalists…)!? I had a week in March where I had 7 exhibitions and two years of work cancelled which wasn’t particularly fun. It has been difficult being self-employed and I hope the brilliant work that people have done in raising awareness of the vulnerability of self-employed and zero hour contract workers has helped the public to appreciate cultural and hospitality workers better.

On the flip side, I’ve had more time in my studio at 36 Lime Street, which is just a dreamland to work in, a building full of lots of talented, diverse makers in the heart of the Ouseburn – my windows open right onto the river so I get to work to the sound of the water and the ducks and swans flapping about.

I’ve  also loved watching things like #ArtistSupportPledge, Beccy Owen’s Pop up Choirs, Mutual aid support groups and Artists’ Union England’s solidarity fund come together. The arts are a mixed bunch of brilliant, creative, bloomin’ hard working people, and even in all this weirdness, they’ve given me lots of moments of joy and celebration.

Bethan Maddocks in her 36 Lime Street Studio

That made me so teary, I’m so proud to be in this sector with wonderful folx like you! Do you have anything to say about artists being described as “unviable”  ?  

I mean it is ridiculous isn’t it!? Weapons manufacturing, the aviation industry and fossil fuel use aren’t exactly viable, if we want to have a happy, existing planet, and yet governments never seem to pull them up…

I think there are things in the arts that aren’t particularly viable – like reserving huge amounts of funds for top management and the running and upkeep of buildings rather than fair living wages for all employees, and I hope that this can change.

And look at everything that we’ve ever sent into space to be found by future/other civilisations, or any time capsules that we’ve buried in the ground and they are full of the arts – music, literature, artwork, Da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man carved on the side etc. Our society is defined by its culture past and present – make that unviable and you have a pretty grey world.

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An answer like that is exactly why I bliddy love you Bethan! I personally believe creative opportunities for all are more important now, than ever – as a process for folx to make sense of what’s happening, feel connected to others, express themselves…… any thoughts? 

Definitely; it’s what’s kept us all sane hasn’t it! As unsatisfying as culture being mostly online can be it’s also opened the doors for some brilliant new ways of engagement and accessibility- I think of all those people with mobility issues, with young kids, with low self-confidence who in the past haven’t have been able to engage in the arts physically, who were effectively blocked from going over the threshold and now they can join in. They can settle their kids, pour a glass of wine and go online and join in on a bookmaking course, or watch a piece of live theatre, or go to a gig on their couch. We’ve got to celebrate that. And when things become more open again, we’ve got to make sure that we keep people with us, that this new accessibility doesn’t stop with a vaccine, but changes the landscape. We’ve got to make this the best learning that we can.

Bethan Maddocks – NHS Celebration artwork

Can you tell us a highlight of 2020? 

I’ve missed live music; there’s not much better than having a dance at a gig with your mates, so I had a particularly brilliant birthday, in amongst this strange year. County Durham based arts organisation Jack Drum Arts, were organising doorstep gigs with musicians and storytellers coming to perform for small groups during the summer holidays. My Mum surreptitiously organised for the legends that are Baghdaddies to come and play in her garden for me and my twin sister on our birthday. We had our own tiny festival- sousaphones, trumpets, drumkits popping out of the flower beds, mojitos in our hands as we “wiggled our bums, our big fat bums…”. That was pretty heady.

Bethan Maddocks – Book of Shadows

Sounds glorious! So, what’s next for you? Can you tell us about a project you’ve got coming up? 

I have an exhibition ‘Finders Seekers’ that has just ‘opened’ at Greenfield arts (although currently no-one can visit it!). It was a lush commission to create artwork around ideas of possibility, changing perspectives and inquiry.

The exhibition is made up of a series of paper installations of trees, mushrooms and lichen combined with objects such as ropes, ladders and magnifying glasses – tools of investigation and elevation.   I spent most of Christmas hand-painting and cutting 300 paper oak leaves to thread onto a ladder!

I wanted to create a fun, celebratory, optimistic exhibition; artworks interconnected like an ecosystem, where the viewer enters a childlike world, a paper-made forest full of metaphor, imagination and elevation.

Where can we keep in touch with you and check out your work?

I’m currently reworking on my website with the brilliant Branded by Naomi and I’m hoping to have a snazzy new launch of it early this year www.bethanmaddocks.com. Or if you want to find photos, drawings, papercutting videos and the occasional lycra-clad leg kick you can find me on Instagram bethan_maddocks.

Bethan Maddocks – Christmas Carol Lit & Phil

Thank you Bethan! Interviews like this make me feel so certain that I’m in the right sector, working and collaborating with glorious humans and that the power and potential of art, is that it can change the world and make such a difference in people’s lives.

That’s all for now Culture Vultures……until next time!

Make & Mend Festival 2019; A feast & a festival for creatives, crafters & makers…

Well the festival season is fully upon us now and I don’t know about you, but I’m SUPER excited. There are festivals out there to tickle everyone’s fancy; food, music, film, South Asian arts, LGBTQ+, design and even craft!

Make & Mend festival is a one day festival on 7th July at Preston Park in Stockton all about celebrating colour and championing creativity – it’s a day in which you can take the whole day just for you to have a go at different crafts during workshops and take part in Big Makes, watch demos, meet fellow makers, buy creative product lushness from independents and just absorb the creative atmosphere. It’s also a day which invests into wellbeing – so there are wellbeing talks with experts (in this busy world, we all need a bit of advice and empowerment to help us be our best selves), yoga sessions, time to explore the grounds of Preston Park and lush foodie options to purchase through-out the day to keep that creative fuel high!

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Tickets are flying now with their only being one week to go and some workshop slot are sold out and others about to….but there is still time to get your ticket (Starting price £10). Visit website for tickets and here to check out the line up on the day to whet your creative appetite!

I heard about Make & Mend festival last year – I didn’t go and I had a SERIOUS cause of FOMO. One of those events, that everyone who went and everyone who took part in it, raved about and the festival decorations were so innovative – insta worthy x a million. If you’re like me, well you’ll hate missing out too. So this year, when I heard it was happening again, whilst chatting to fellow creatives at Thought Foundation, again everyone was raving about it and how excited they were and I vowed to go!

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Well low and behold – how buzzing was I when Rachel and Lyndsey, the imaginers behind the whole festival got in touch and invited me along on the day to do some live social media taking over their channels to chart the event and all the happenings. One of the things, I always said when I started out with Culture Vulture, was that I’d only work with and champion things that were part of the culture vulture ethos and after chatting to Rachel and Lyndsey, I can confirm they are fearless good eggs with big ambitions for this festival…..

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As that has become tradition on this blog – well I thought I’d catch up with them and interview them to tease out from their perspective why Make & Mend festival is the craft festival you’ve been waiting for and to give the full low down….

So over to Rachel and Lyndsey….

Right let’s start at the beginning…..who are you?

Rachel – We are Make & Mend Company, two friends Rachel & Lyndsey who wanted to set up in business together after redundancy from our day jobs. We combined our passions for making and well being to create a company that celebrates the positive benefits making and in particular sewing can have on your mental health.

The Culture Vulture – As a passionate advocate in the mental health agenda, that sounds right up my street. I advocate the power of drama and writing and you sewing…..basically being creative and having creative opportunities are essential to a balanced happy mind!

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So tell me about the festival?

Lyndsey – We have a strong belief that making is good for the soul and the festival basically shares this passion. It will be a fantastic day filled with lots of creative opportunities, in a relaxing environment with other like-minded craft addicts – what’s not to love?!

A fun day of colour, character, positivity and wellbeing and we hope people will leave feeling inspired and rejuvenated. There will be the opportunity to enjoy workshops ranging from embroidery to aromatherapy; floral watercolour to bookbinding. There will be artist demos in weaving, letter press and printing from expert makers. We are offering inspiring talks from wellbeing experts which will give you tips on how to integrate more positivity and self-care into your life. There will also be yoga classes where you can unwind for a while and a maker marketplace where you can buy some beautiful handmade products and supplies from some fantastic local makers and artists.

The festival is basically an opportunity to take some time out in beautiful surroundings, relax and unleash your creative spirit!

The Culture Vulture – I’m a firm believer that everyone has a creative spirit bursting to get out!

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Tickets have slightly changed this year from last….tell me about the ticket options available?

So this year we have a few different ticket options;

  • Entry only which gives you access to the full festival site, drop in workshops, craft demos, makers market, talks from well-being experts and access to the well-being garden area for delicious food and relaxing in the sunshine!
  • Then you have the option to add 1 hour workshops into your day with our team of expert crafters making something to take away and learning a new skill and the ticket options include entry +1 workshop, entry +2 workshops and entry +3 workshops (which is our best value ticket).

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Why are crafting and creative opportunities so important?

Lyndsey – We set up Make & Mend because we recognised the importance that craft and creativity has on improving our well-being and we wanted to share this with the world! For us, crafting is a way to relax and unwind; we find it very therapeutic and it is our way of switching off. Everyone is creative (whether they believe it or not!) and doing something creative regularly is a way of exploring your individuality and expressing yourself, giving you freedom to explore new ideas. It’s also a great antidote to sitting at a computer or being on your phone – there’s nothing better than creating something beautiful by hand!

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Advice to someone who has never crafted before but fancies coming along to the festival?

Rachel- Just get started! There can be a real fear that ‘I’m not arty’ or ‘I can’t draw’ but guess what neither can I! It is as much about enjoying the process as it is the end result plus there are so many brilliant crafts out there, that if you don’t get along with one, then just try another! Buying a kit is a great way to try a craft without having to spend a lot on buying materials and equipment.

The Culture Vulture – Oh gosh – I hear you. I was told all through school I was “bad at art” meaning I couldn’t draw…but I’m actually one of the most creative people I know…. I just REALLY can’t draw!

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If you used to craft all the time, but you’ve just got out of the habit or stopped having the time – what’s your advice?

Lyndsey – Same as above – just do it! Start somewhere – it doesn’t matter what the outcome is; it’s about developing confidence again and getting back into the habit. I think we sometimes put high expectations on ourselves about the outcome which can take the joy out of something, but it’s just about enjoying the process and seeing where it takes you. And if it all goes wrong, who cares?

The Culture Vulture – I totally agree with you – I attended a Crafthood event many moons ago and made a red nose day pompom…..it went totally wrong and provided much hilarity for myself, my mum and the gals from the Crafthood, but actually I had such a good evening and loved having a go at something new. Also Sebastian loves chasing it around my kitchen to this day, so everyone was a winner!

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Favourite type of craft?

Rachel – My favourites are all things textile, love a bit of needle felt to stab the stress away, plus embroidery of course!

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Why do you think crafting has come back into fashion?

Lyndsey – It’s great that things seem to have come full circle and there is such an interest in craft again. I think people have realised how beneficial it is to our wellbeing in terms of it being a way to relax. It’s also an anti-device activity! We spend so much time on our phones and on technology that I think people are craving something practical that they can do with their hands. Obviously the interest in sustainability and recycling has had a big impact as people are seeing the value in making and mending again.

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What gave you the inspo for the festival last year?

We run smaller workshops and really enjoyed sharing our ethos with more people and figured why not do something a bit bigger. Our backgrounds are in event management and outdoor festivals so it seemed like an obvious next step. Plus we couldn’t find anything nearby to go to ourselves and it felt like a good time to start celebrating making again!

The Culture Vulture – They say not to put on events for yourself, but actually I’m same, when I see there isn’t something out there that matches what I want, it usually signifies a gap and opportunity!

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So, this is year two for the festival, tell me what’s new for this year?

Lyndsey – We have new workshops such as macramé, bookbinding, printing, aromatherapy, origami and floral wreath making. Our artist demos are also new – opportunities for people to watch the experts and learn a new skill. We also have an artist in residence this year – Raquel Rodrigo who creates beautiful large-scale cross stitch installations. She will be creating something special for us this year at the festival and will be holding workshops where people can get involved and learn more about her techniques.

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One of Raquel Rodrigo’s pieces on a building in Barcelona

Many of last year’s visitors raved about the decorations – where did you get the inspo for them?

Rachel – It’s really all about the colour for us, anything bright and colourful we love! It always starts with a Pinterest board and looking for inspiration online, we create everything ourselves as we are working to a really small budget so we keep it simple and luckily we have a beautiful venue which helps!

The Culture Vulture – The best decorations are done on a budget, it gives the opportunity to get REALLY creative…I LOVED the umbrellas from last year- they are so simple an idea, but yet I’ve never seen it before and it just looked amazing!

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How did you select your list of workshops/facilitators for this year?

Lyndsey – We look at crafting trends and integrate what is current – for example, macramé is hot at the moment! We spend a lot of time researching local artists and finding out what skills are available locally. We always try and keep to local artists where we can.

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An embroidery hoop design you can have a go at one the day with Make & Mend Co

For the more avid crafter, what’s unique about this event?

Rachel – I think it is the range of different workshops on offer and they are such a high quality; we have selected the best makers we can find to teach the workshops so there is bound to be a new craft to learn.

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If YOU were attending as a punter – what activity or workshop would you be most excited about doing yourselves?

If I was coming I would be desperate to make a macramé pot hanger, an origami lampshade and I would love to make a floral wreath (sorry that’s three!). Also really interested in learning more about aromatherapy and the benefits of essential oils.

The Culture Vulture – I have seen the macramé pot hanger and I’ve seen it modelled with a bottle of prosecco in which obviously spiked my interest….crafty, lush AND functional for my Friday feeling vibe…I want to have a go at macramé too!

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You’ve united crafting, making and mindfulness and well-being together….why did you make this connection?

Rachel – I guess the connection has always been there for me, in stressful times I have always turned to sewing to help me, same as some people go running, do gardening or cook. It was always my way to relax and switch off so making people more aware of the mindful benefits of sewing was always something I wanted highlight – that’s why in our embroidery kits we give instructions on how to sew but also on how to appreciate the process and make it a mindful experience.

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To a complete creative nut slash workaholic like myself, I’m actually the most super excited about the talks…can you tell me a bit about them and how you curated them?

Lyndsey – We’re super excited about the talks programme too! We have huge interest in self-care and improving our wellbeing and think that these talks will offer lots of valuable tips which people can integrate into their everyday lives.

We’re wellbeing addicts and are always buying books and attending courses as it has made such a huge different to our lives and helping us to adopt a more positive and resilient attitude. We have been really inspired by our speakers – we either follow them on Instagram, have done their courses or read their articles. We think the topics they will be covering can really make a difference in terms of supporting people to look after themselves and improving their mind-set.

The Culture Vulture – One of the things that I’m learning as The Culture Vulture, is that barriers exist, stopping people being creative or jumping at opportunities – the whole, not having time, feeling guilty for taking time out, lacking in confidence at trying something new etc – so I think with your talks, you’re hitting the nail on the head. I’m really looking forward to live tweeting them!

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What do you want people to take away from the festival?

Rachel – We want them to have fun, make something, relax, meet new people, enjoy a little time for themselves and leave feeling inspired to try and include a little more making in their lives!

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Well there you have it – a colourful day with a festival vibe of making, creating and taking time out for yourself awaits at Make & Mend Festival on 7th July at Preston Park in Stockton. Tickets are still available but they are selling really quickly now with one week to go, so don’t be like me and spend the rest of the year with FOMO, get your ticket now!

And if you’ve already got your ticket – then YASSSS- make sure to use #makemendfest on the day so I can spy on your creative shenanigans.

(Credit given for the majority of photos used above to Clare Bowes Photography)

Thoughtful Night Market Winter 18

There is still something for me about a Saturday night….I struggle to stay in (not a Saturday night TV fan) and yet, the call of Saturday nightclubs are long gone! But I still crave to get out and about on a Saturday night! I love going to different things on a Saturday night that still have an evening vibe and a bit different. This Saturday night I’m hitting up Thought Foundation in Birtley Gateshead for The Thoughtful Night Market Winter 18 edition!

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If you’ve been along before – you’ll know how magical and lush this event is (this one’s even bigger and better!) – but if you haven’t, then it’s a must for this Saturday evening! Go along, go as a troop and I’ll be lurking there.

I thought I’d take some time out from what has been an insane week of Culture Vulture work so far to catch up with my faves The Crafthood who present this event with Thought Foundation!

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Well hello lovelies…right so tell my fellow Culture Vultures who you are and what you do?

We are The Crafthood; a North East based modern craft company. We are a female duo; Kay & Sharon and we deliver contemporary craft workshops and events as well as designing and producing a range of products.

(Visit their website to see all their lushness in all it’s glory and their Instagram game is pretty good too! http://www.thecrafthood.co.uk)

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Now onto what we are here to hear about….tell everyone about the Thoughtful Night Market!

The Thoughtful Night Market is a collaborative project with the wonderful Thought Foundation. First held in November 2017, we set out to create a ‘market’ that was experiential and engaging with a focus on the provenance, ethics and ethos of the businesses that were selling.

We wanted attendees to come along and have a great night out… for it to be a pleasure away from the hustle of the high street with a great atmosphere; music, great food and a programme of workshops on offer. We also wanted to support and showcase amazing local small creative businesses – at an event they enjoy and are also happy to be part of. We really wanted to champion the #shopindie movement and encourage guests to see the lovely range of unique goodies and talent that is out there. This is the third event and each time round we learn and build something new into it.

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Crafthood Baubles

So tomorrow evening; what can people expect when they visit the Thoughtful Night Market?

There are 2 goody bag drops – for the first 25 through the door at both 5pm or 7:30pm so if you are lucky you may receive one of these bags of treasure made up of a selection of goodies from our stall holders.

Once through the door they can beat the winter chill with some amazing food and drink from the super tasty brain food kitchen at Thought Foundation. There are a selection of creative workshops going on through the night from festive watercolour to chunky knitting to terrarium baubles (more on that later).  There will be live music throughout the evening from a singer that Leanne (Thought Foundation) found, the artist was busking on Northumberland Street at the time!

However, the main feature is of course, the beautiful stalls made up of 25 of the regions’ finest makers and creators alongside the Thought Foundation Shop, which is in constant residence. This is a chance to chat with and meet the makers and find out the story behind the items you choose. If you are a selfie fan then make sure you find the balloon backdrop from our event stylist Imaginarium Balloons – it’s the stuff of Instagram dreams. We hope you feel it is cosy and thoughtfully put together. Entry into the Thoughtful Night Market is £3.50 which includes a donation to our chosen charity Help Refugees – a double whammy of the feel-good factor.

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Crafthood product

You’ve mentioned workshops….what is available to take part in across the evening?

We have three workshops running across the night. Firstly, Festive Watercolour Gift tags with Katie Burns from Katie Burns Design House.  Katie will guide you through some simple contemporary watercolour mark making to create some unique festive gift tags.

Next up, we have Woolly Nana leading a chunky knit hand-woven scarf workshop.  In this workshop you will be provided with everything you need to start your very own chunky hand-woven scarf so no need for needles at all – revelation! Expert tuition will be provided by Woolly Nana and you will leave with your own cosy winter scarf and the skills to make more.

Finally, we have a workshop that is now sold out – Terrarium Bauble making – a little birdie tells us that this proved so popular Hoe’s & Ditches are running another at Thought Foundation on December 2nd.

All of these workshops are available to book onto in advance via Event Brite (all include cost of entry into the event).

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I’m passionate about purchasing all my Christmas gifts from independents this year…. So tell me more about the traders?

We have over 25 very varied traders with us on the night and have recently written a blog which details them all (along with a few of our other favourite North East indies) and have really tried to cover all bases so you’ll get something for everyone.

(Culture Vultures you can read the blog post here! )

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What about the live music? Can’t have a Saturday night without some music….

Along with the chance to participate in a creative workshop, we have live music from Megan Davidson. You can check her out before the event on spotify – we cannot wait to hear her on the night and Megan may even provide a little entertainment outside to people waiting to get in! It’s the third market of its kind and have found that people come along and help contribute to the atmosphere and banter so whether you come with friends, partners or family; it’s a great chance to get Christmas ready in a chilled out way.

How did this collaboration with Thought Foundation come about?

We connected with Thought Foundation as soon as we heard about them. They appealed to us so much because of the ethos behind their brand; Thoughtfulness, Kindness and Creativity – so much positivity!! In the very first meeting we had with Leanne (Thought Foundation co-founder) we discussed having a market in their space and around six months later the first Thoughtful Night Market was actually happening!  We were so worried that nobody would turn up but had almost 300 people through the door and a queue to get in!!

Thought Foundation are a dream team to work with and having similar values means that the event has a strong identity that we are continuing to build. We love working with them! They are so pro-active and have so many ideas, that they are both a joy and inspiration to be around.

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Leanne and Gareth – Team Thought Foundation!

This is a silly question – because Thought Foundation is just a lush unique space – but I’m going to ask it anyway! Why did you pick Thought Foundation as a venue?

For anyone who hasn’t been to Thought Foundation then we always urge people to check it out. It is in Birtley, Gateshead and we LOVE the fact that a creative arts space and is thriving in this area.  The space is an ideal market venue as all traders are in the same area allowing for a unique atmosphere.  Thought Foundation already has a beautiful and eclectic shop (which is like having another beautiful stall in the place).  It is easy to get to being on a major bus route from both Durham and Newcastle and there is parking around the venue.  Thought Foundation epitomises everything the market stands for and is a unique blend of creativity, energy, warmth and thoughtfulness so it’s how could we not?!

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Thought Foundation

You’ve piqued my interest when you mention goody bags…. Tell us more!

The goody bags are EPIC. We ask every trader to provide a small number of items that are then distributed across the bags.  Traders are unbelievably generous and so the goody bags are not just full of flyers/business cards but host a range of beautiful bespoke goodies.  We have already made up the goody bags this year and yet again have been blown away by what we have been able to put in them! Think gin, jewellery, greetings cards, baubles – we are not surprised that people queue round the block to get their hands on them.  Each bag is hand lettered by us too.

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You had me a gin….Now this is a good question and something we all collectively champion….Why is it important to buy from independents at Christmas/In general?

Shopping from local independents feels good; not only will the individual maker be truly grateful that you have chosen them (and do a happy dance with each sale!!), you are also supporting the local economy and creative sector. When you buy independent, like at the Thoughtful Night Market, you will get the unique opportunity of being able to chat to the maker and ask questions that they can easily and happily answer.  They will often go the extra mile; for example by offering a beautifully packaged purchased or arranging to make something to your requirements. In buying independent, you are investing in the maker and contributing to developing a local talent helping to secure vibrant and diverse gift options. You are also securing a unique item that cannot be purchased widely on the high street – perfect for anyone wanting the wow factor.

We are passionate supporters of the movement towards ‘consciously consuming’ – shopping thoughtfully, investing in great quality items that are well crafted using quality resources by makers who know their supply chain. We have consistently found that small creative businesses often have ethical making and creating at their core.

Shopping indie is just all round more colourful and joyful than the alternative! Please do support what independents you can even if it is #just a card.

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Couldn’t agree with you more ladies! Right….Culture Vultures The Thoughtful Nightmare is just a lush and different way to spend a Saturday night. I’m itching to see what’s on offer and will be doing some live social media during the event as The Culture Vulture. I will share my haul of goodies purchased from all the lush stall holders too…..

And of course – look up The Crafthood for all their lush work! http://www.thecrafthood.co.uk

Project: WORTH – Lady Kitt, defacing bank notes,gender equality, championing brilliant women & crowdfunding!

So this is a first for my blog…..I’m revisiting an artist I’ve interviewed before…Lady Kitt. When I interviewed her last time it was the very beginning of getting to know her after fangirling from a far. Since then…we’ve met lots of times and I’ve seen her work, one of her performances and fallen in love with her even more. Officially one of my favourite humans.

You can read my last blog post here – find out all about Lady Kitt, her practice and of course Nasty Women North East.

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Now for this post – I’m going Lady Kitt project specific; I’m talking about LK’s project WORTH. And I will let LK tell you in her own words about the project but this post feels timely to me. At the heart of project WORTH is the (rational) human ideal of gender equality. It’s about championing the women who have fought and raised the rest of us up enabling and empowering us politically, professionally, inspirationally and everything in between. It’s also about recognising the areas of work and sectors where women remain under-represented and highlights that we still have some work to do!

So I’ve been incredibly disheartened and surprised that in sharing on my social channels other projects, art and blog posts about gender equality and championing women that I’ve lost audience and received messages from individuals who clearly do not champion gender equality and feminism – and it has reminded me how essential projects like WORTH and how brave people like LK are for putting themselves out there…..

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LK is crowdfunding for project WORTH and it won’t happen with you! It really seriously won’t….we need you to donate. Before we move on to LK – I thought I’d express why I love this project and why I’m donating to it….

It recognises the wonderful humans that fought and enabled some of us to get the vote. I think sometimes we forget how big a deal it was for The Suffragettes to stand up against society and the patriarchy of the time and demand change, to be heard and ensured visibility. We are forever indebted to these women – they enabled us to strive towards the path where women can be anything and anyone they want to be….astronauts, business owners, politicians, playboy bunnies, Britney Spears….

It’s championing women in underrepresented sectors… it’s so important to recognise that there is still work that needs to be done and there are still some sectors where a woman is a lone voice in the room. And I’ve been that lone woman before….

Project WORTH is empowering women – by supporting this project – we are supporting and enabling others! You’re uniting women with a cause and common voice – encouraging them to discover and realise their worth within them….WORTH really speaks to my interests, my motivations as The Culture Vulture (to empower others) and of course, my heart.

So let’s hand over to Lady Kitt to find out more about the project.

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For those that didn’t read my last blog post….. tell me who you are and a bit about you?

Hiya, I’m Kitt. I live in Newcastle and LOVE the North East with a wild passion. I’m an artist, an activist, a Nasty Women, a drag king and a parent to two lush little people. My favourite colour is red and I’m the oldest person I know who likes emojis as much as I do.

You’ve been called “The International Superstar of feminism”…. How the bliddy hell did that feel

😀 😁  😃 😄 😅 😆 😉 😊 😋 😎 😍 😘 😗 😙 😚

It felt a bit like that ^^

It’s a pretty bold statement made by Callum and Alex the lovely folks behind Creative Debuts (CD) London. The local feminist art group that I’m part of, Nasty Women North East, collaborated on a project with CD earlier in the year and from that they invited us to be part of The Anti-Art Fair in London in October. The fair is a celebration of international creativity and a call for greater diversity in the arts. If you’re in London Oct 4th-7th get yourself along!! You can even get a lovely little (33%) Nasty discount by using the discount code NWFRIENDS.

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Nasty Women North East are showcasing a couple of our projects ‘the (small but) FIERCE mag’ – a magazine for children who want to change the world and the adults who support them and the Nasty Women International Art Prize 2018. I’m also one of the artists showing work in the Nasty Women section of the fair, curated by Elijah Wheat Showroom, New York..

Being labelled an International Super of Feminism is totally mega … generally I’m pretty confident about my abilities, you certainly couldn’t call me modest; but when I saw that – blush inducing for sure and anything like that label comes with sense of responsibility. So I feel like I’d better boss the shit out of this feminist ‘art-ing’ now someone’s said that. So LET’S DO IT!

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What’s been your experience as an identifying female in the work place and in the arts?

On an interpersonal level, for me, generally fine, often fantastic. But I have heard dreadful things from other women in the arts. One women I know missed out on a big commission because she had recently got married and the commissioners assumed that she was going to have children (which she wasn’t) and assumed that by having children she would no longer be able to take on work- rubbish!!

On a more general level- fucking dreadful. It’s been relatively well reported in national media in the last year or so, that there is a woeful lack of female artists in public collections. Not just lack of women but the general lack of diversity is mind bogglingly bad. Many institutions are addressing this, but it’s a slow old slog.

It’s not just changing the attitudes to collecting but also changing the way that existing collections shown, interpreted and cared for. With a few exceptions the lack of women in senior roles in museums, galleries, within funding bodies, educational institutions etc, really effects all this. Also, the prices women artists can expect for their work is considerable less than for male artists. There tends to be poor provision for parents in the Arts. Residencies, especially rarely offer provision / support for artist with caring responsibilities. I could go on and on and on…

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So today we are chatting about your project: WORTH…. Can you tell me about the project? What’s it about? What was the inspiration?

It started early last year! Our children have some great books celebrating amazing women in history- which are absolutely lush, however a lot of these women are dead or super-duper famous. So I thought I’d like to teach my children about women who I personally think are amazing – but aren’t necessarily as well known.  I was inspired by Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign to have more women represented on Bank of England issue bank notes – so I’ve celebrated these women and created portraits – papercutting the faces of several local women like MP Chi Onwurah and drag artist Venus Di Milo onto various currency notes. I’ve also included some completely astonishing children who are already awesome campaigners and activists.

Bank Of England Unveils Jane Austen Ten Pound Note

Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign led to Jane Austen appearing on the above £10 note

Finding out about all these people has been so inspiring- it makes me feel good about the world. It’s also, connected to the centenary of (some) women’s right to vote in the UK- it pulls together a lot of things I’m interested in. But, you know the more I think about it, the more I realise it’s a bit of love letter really to these women I admire and to my children. I want to show them everyone has the ability to make the world a better place and to do things that they believe in- age, gender, all sorts of other stuff might get in your way, but it doesn’t have to stop you.

Projects like this are essential to celebrate how far we’ve come and highlight areas that need to be worked on – you’re a creative change maker! Where do you think women are the most underrepresented?

In the UK it’s in STEM for sure. One of my WORTH portraits is of Prof Charlotte Roberts, Archaeology professor at Durham University; for me she is a great example of a women who has approached work in STEM and in academia in a really unusual and interesting way- she actually started her career as a nurse. If you have a chance – look her up I would really recommend it; she has done some great interviews and is really fun and engaging about her subject.

Over the last 10 years I done several of collaborations with scientists (many of the women) and have heard first-hand accounts of gender discrimination within STEM workplaces. This prompted me to start researching about women in STEM, which is quite depressing. According to Wise Campaign statistics, in the UK in 2017 only 23% of the STEM workforce identified as female. But there are some fantastic people and organisations working to change this. For anyone interested in this the Athena SWAN awards and charter is a great place to start.

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You have and will immortalise some amazing women by papercutting their portraits out of currency notes……but why use paper currency and paper cutting as the medium?

A loooong time ago- before I studied art, I used to make stencils for spray painted work. I made thousands of them! And then I started to look at the stencils and think “these are quite interesting object in themselves”. I didn’t really do anything with it for ages, until my sister commissioned me to create some artwork for an album by her then band (Bridie Jackson and the Arbour).

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Album cover

Initially the idea was to create a spray painted work, but as it developed into a paper cut and that was the first time I really made a finished work that was a paper cut. I love the simplicity of the process, I love that it’s pretty eco-friendly, I love that it’s so fragile…. The practice is largely considered to be a craft, it’s something that has a long history of being made in a domestic setting, often by women, from old newspapers etc – Beamish Museum has some great example of some of these for anyone who, like me, is a paper nerd.

It’s a pretty performative art form- As much of my practice is performance based that appeals to me hugely- Hans Christen Anderson used to tell stories and make paper cuts at the same time- by the end of the story he would present the listeners with a paper cut character from the tale! I just love it.

Cutting up money started with wanting to create a response to Caroline Criado-Perez’s campaign. I made the first piece in 2017, which is of Malala Yousifazi. I showed it at the 1st UK Nasty Women exhibition and it was really well received and then brought by a collector in Amsterdam. That experience just made me want to do more. Also, cutting up money is very fun- physically fun because it’s thin but strong and smooth which is great for very intricate paper cuts and it feels a tad anarchic!

I’d been doing the series for over a year before I realized that there is quite a community of money defacing artists round the world! I started following a few on Instagram and then the fantastic Bob Osborne (Rebel not Taken) approached me to be in a book of defaced banknote art and an exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery; since then I’ve met loads of fellow money artists – it’s great!

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Elements of WORTH is featured in the book Cash is King – available in The Saatchi Gallery, London; can you tell me how this came about? It’s totally brilliant!

Via Instagram.

There are loads of shit things about Instagram- I could write a book about those; but there are also very good things. Being able to directly connect with people all over the world who share a very specific interest or a passion with you is one.

I used the hashtag #feministdefacedbanknoteart And that’s how it happened…

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You’re crowdfunding for this project…. Tell me why should people support the project and donate?

The feedback I’ve had from supporters of the project so far is that they are excited to be part of a project that reflects their political believes, supports a local artist and is celebratory. People have been extremely generous and some have told me what they would have used the money for if not for the project- which is really interesting (everything from designer socks, to gig tickets, packets of fags and a months’ worth of “posh” cleaning products!!). This project has already had many successes and looks set to have more- I think it’s fun for people to be able to say- “I helped make that project happen“. Which is absolutely true- despite having sold work from the series I have completely run out of money to move the project forward- it’s pretty expensive coz- you know I’m cutting up 50 quid notes … every time someone donates I get closer to creating the next work in the series, that’s vital for me and exciting for supporters.

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So now on to the mega important question; how do people donate to support project: WORTH?

Through my Just Giving page

If WORTH is successfully funded – what will it enable you to do?

It will enable me to make, exhibit and promote the whole series of 13 planned works. I will also run a workshop on how to create a successful gender equality project like Caroline Criado-Perez’s project.

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You’ve got loads of brilliant rewards if people support the crowdfunding campaign – can you tell me a bit about them?

Aww thank you- I’m glad you like them! I think it’s really important to offer something back to people who have supported the project. Any amount up to £25- I invite people pop into my studio (in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK) and pick something from my portfolio of sketches, practice pieces and unfinished beauties; they tend to be A4. £25 will get you one of my $1 skull cuts, entitled “So many ways I love you”; each one is made by cutting between 30-80 love heart shapes from a $1dollar bill.

The pieces are backed with black card and accompanied by a small glass vial filled with the cut out hearts! I also keep making odd different dollar cuts like a zebra or a butterfly- keep an eye on my social if you want to see what I come up with next…..

£70 will get you a bespoke portrait (created by cutting hearts from a single sheet of papyrus) of a subject of your choice.

£100 a 2.5 hr paper cutting workshop at my house or studio for 2-6 people

£300 one of the Worth pieces once the exhibition is finished

Apart from the workshop, these are all super reduced prices for the work and are only available through the Just Giving campaign! I am also, open to suggestions so if there’s something someone wants and they think I might be able to do it- they should just get in touch!

Are you going to have a project launch party if the funding is successful?

YES!!! I love a party and I especially love a feminist art party. On Fri Nov 2nd 7-10 pm at the glorious PRAXIS Gallery in Commercial Union house in Newcastle I will be unveiling the completed series; there will be interactive art, music, performances, and FREE drinks. Everyone is welcome.

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What was the moment you realised your ‘WORTH’ as a woman? And also as an artist?

There are so many answers to this question- it’s a constant evolution. I’m generally pretty confident, but there are certainly been times where I’ve questioned myself especially when our children where very little. Not exactly my WORTH, but thought am I doing enough? Am I looking outwards enough or I’m I just getting a bit insular And nest-y?!

Getting involved in Nasty Women was part of the answer to those questions. I guess I was thinking- being a “good parent” isn’t just about looking out for the children’s immediate needs- it’s about looking at the world more widely and thinking what could do with changing- what battles have I had that I don’t want my children to have, or at least I don’t want them to have those battles feeling unsupported.

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WORTH celebrates some women getting the vote…. How do you feel about the Suffragette movement? I sometimes feel like there is another wave happening right now – people like me and you as the rebels pushing and championing…..

I think some of the utter drivel that we still have to put up with even now irrespective of the things we campaign for is terrible – And that’s now, in the 21st century, where we are supported by people all over the world, where there are feminist politicians, policy makers and police officers. We have so many rights and come from such a base of strength in many ways. And it’s STILL hard as fuck.

I just can’t even imagine how complex it must have been for people involved in the suffragette movement back in the 1900s. Having said all that, I’m still very uncomfortable with the acts of destruction and violence that some campaigners carried out. Also the Suffragettes were a women only organisation- not my sort of thing. I think things will be fairer and better by everyone having a stake in the change and through cooperation; not be excluding certain groups. But then there are also things about the Suffragists which I find complicated- it was largely a very middle class organisation, focussed on parliamentary activity which restricted it to people who lived near London / who could write / afford to send letters. I know I can’t possibly understand the circumstance of those women and how desperate they were for change, but I always want to try and find ways of creating change in peaceful and cooperative ways. Having said that I’m the one who’s chopping up 100s of pounds worth of perfectly legal, useful money to make a point, so what do I know…

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Do you a role model/inspiration?

Soo, so many- that’s what WORTH is all about!! This could be a loooong list, but some people who really inspire me at the moment: My amazing sister Bridie Jackson, Nasty Women North East co- founders Michaela Wetherell and Aly Smith, one of my WORTH subjects Francesca Di Giorgio, long term chum and male Nasty Woman David Wright and You.

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Ohhh being one of your inspirations…. Now that is a BIG compliment and you’re one of mine. How would you describe a modern day feminist in 2018?

Me! You! Anyone (any gender, age, background- no Limits) who believes in gender equality.

Project: WORTH in 2019 is….?

Aaaaahhhh exciting- sooo many plans and amazing opportunities. I can’t say much specific at the moment, but WORTH is going International.

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Well that sounds flipping exciting….. and sounds like I will be doing another Lady Kitt blog post in 2019!

So please donate to Project: WORTH – if any of the above has hit a cord and lit a fire in your belly – please donate. Only you can make this amazing project happen! You can donate HERE!

Very soon I will be doing some live social media from INSIDE Lady Kitt’s studio (8th October) – I will be going behind the scenes of Project: WORTH in action!

You can also find out more about and meet Lady Kitt by booking on to her Paper Cutting workshop in Gateshead on 11th October! It’s 12 per ticket, you’ll be using Project: WORTH as inspiration for your papercutting and you will also be able to donate to WORTH during the workshop.

And that’s all for now Culture Vultures!

p.s. DONATE!

Are you in the Crafthood?

We all know I love small businesses….that’s a given right? Well what I love even more than that, is a small business that are absolutely owning and disrupting an established sector……And of course, what else could top trumps this? – well of course; an all-female run creative business….

Well hello there; The Crafthood….

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The Crafthood are a business that I heard about through other people (always a good sign) so I can’t claim they are my discovery, but I certainly am one of their biggest champions…. First of all what’s in a name? Well The Crafthood have a really good one, just by going to something I feel a part of their ‘hood! I love their name and branding…..Secondly, they are making crafting amazing, exciting, essential for the modern day lass and socially responsible….

Right up my street!

If you don’t know who the Crafthood are…. Well you’re going to over the next 12 months! They are one of the most exciting creative businesses; growing and thriving in the North East currently. Their offering is three fold; they run their own workshops within North East’s up and coming independents – as fantastically talented craftswomen, you’ll get a lush crafting experience like no other. Secondly, they sell a fantastic bespoke range of products; from cards, to notebooks to clothing, to bespoke lettering and signage – all with their lush Crafthood edge! Thirdly, they organise their own events or add value to a pre-established event (keep an eye out for their pop-ups).

The Crafthood invited me along to one of their Brush Lettering workshops as a punter in May 2017 and I absolutely loved it……so where to begin…..

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First and foremost, I’d like to say that The Crafthood workshops are for both artsy and crafty folk and others (like me!) – so for those that love crafting and trying new things in a new environment and taking time out just for you, to create; well their workshops are for you. However, if you’re like me and are massively creative but not at all “crafty”, well I can promise these workshops are for you too and you’ll love them.

 

I rocked up to their Brush Lettering workshop, I sat down with the other fellow participants and The Crafthood talked through our beautiful Brush Lettering pack, equipment, exercises and information. The first thing that hit me was the care to detail; everything I had was take away, beautifully presented and made me feel super excited to get started.

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We had 20mins of expert tuition and information (and lush cake and refreshments from Flat Cap Joes) and then we were ready to get started. What was stand out through-out the session was how inclusive the session felt, whilst being able to experiment, chill and get creative. In all honesty, I felt like I was taking time out for me, creating and absolutely loving it! I also was able to chat to other participants through-out the session – was lovely to hear more about them and their creative interests.

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Sharon and Kay (The master creatives behind Crafthood) chatted about their workshop portfolio, which currently consists of Brush Lettering, Soy Wax Candle-making and Modern Calligraphy. They also run their Crafty socials and attend events with add on mini taster workshops. For every workshop or organisation workshop booked, they book another workshop for a community group or charity– buy one gift one. It was lush to hear the “Wearside Women in Need” were benefitting from our brush lettering workshop…..

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When we got hands on with the brush lettering, we worked through lots of different exercises and Kay and Sharon (The Crafthood) were always on hand to guide and offer feedback.

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A lot of exercises were repetitive practicing of shapes and letters; the process of experimenting with technique and shape was really cathartic. As someone who struggles with detail and perfection, I actually found the process really freeing – being able to let go, make marks and just have a go without worrying about what things looked like…..However, I could not and still can’t master a “d”…… I will one day *shakes fist at the sky*…….

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We were working towards a sentence or word – of course, because I’m the Culture Vulture, I wanted to write my name and also CV in brush lettering; luckily no “d”s involved. I was massively surprised how easy it was to become engrossed with the letter shape and completely forget how to spell things…..so there were a few moments when I would look proudly at my work and see letters missing….. boo!

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As I got to the end of the workshop, I thought several things – firstly, I’d really enjoyed myself; I felt like I’d taken time out of the busy to do something lush just for me; this is something I so rarely do. Secondly, I’d learnt something new; I’m all about personal development and challenging myself – I felt walking away from this session that I’d actually developed a brand new skill and that was mint.

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Thirdly, that I’d defs continue this; the lushness of brush lettering is that you can do it anywhere and The Crafthood workshop sets you up nicely with everything you need so you can practice and do it often. I am now a brush lettering aholic (minus the letter “d”)!

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The Crafthood have a whole host of lush workshops, events and activities coming up – they are adding a new workshop to their workshop portfolio every season, so watch out for a developing programming……as always I will be championing them and attending – so check them out Culture Vultures and make sure you become a part of the C ‘Hood.

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