Posy Jowett: my favourite creative onion

Creative people are just like onions…..layers and layers – lots of hidden talents, surprises and so much more than what you see on the surface. The biggest onion I’ve met this year has to be artist, creative and all round megababe Posy Jowett.

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I had the absolute pleasure of working with Posy during Juice Festival – on face value, Posy works at Northern Stage and is a dream working with children, facilitating creative activity.  And then (remember she’s an onion) as part of Juice – Posy had  been commissioned to create re-imaginings in a graphic exhibition showcasing partners, venues and people and it was bliddy fantastic. Jaw dropping amazing – I was blown away! Flash forward to our Juice Festival Culture Camp and Posy drawing an amazing lobster illustration….. it was a really beautiful piece. We all know how furiously jealous I am of people who can draw……

And THEN, it pops up on social media a few weeks ago, sneaky creative Posy was launching her new crafty and creative business; Pocketful of Posy. Posy now sells beautiful hand made product and animals – the attention to detail is immense and I really need more of my friends to have babies so that I can purchase these soft little creatures.

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That’s what I mean about creative people – onions. Posy – working in performing arts and theatre, strong skill set in creative facilitation with children, brilliant graphic designer, naturally talented illustrator and now, a crafty business person designing and sell products. She’s an onion.

So i caught up with Posy recently to find out more about Pocketful of Posy and what is next for this creative onion in 2018…..

Hi Posy, so tell me a bit about yourself?

Well, I have a background in Fine Art – I studied in Sheffield – and have always loved making things. Since moving back to the North East to study for my MA in Cultural Heritage Management, I have worked in a few different roles but missed making things with my hands. I do a little bit of everything; knitting, crochet, pottery, illustration, digital design, lino printing… and now sewing.

Tell me about your brand spanking new creative business – you sneakily launched it and I love the name Pocketful of Posy!

When my sister in law was pregnant with my nephew, Leo, I wanted to make her and her new family a handmade gift. I always over-gift (I love giving presents) and so in addition to the crochet baby blanket I spent hours making I decided to make the new baby a toy. I rummaged through the boxes of craft things that I hoard at home and found a pair of jeans that didn’t fit anyone and one of my boyfriend’s striped shirts that he didn’t wear any more – and they became the first whale.

A mutual friend, Bryony Villiers-Stuart asked that I make her a whale because she loved Leo’s so much, so I made another. This Autumn out of the blue, I had a phone call from Bryony to say she was putting together an ethical makers collective to exhibit and sell work in Hexham this winter, and asked if I would make some soft toys, like the whales, to sell. So I started drawing and trying out designs for my animals, and have ended up with a collection! It’s literally the last week or so that I’ve begun to think that maybe this is a business that I can keep going, so I’ve created Pocketful of Posy.

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I love your products – very lush and special.

I love them too! I am totally dedicated to reducing my carbon footprint and one of the ways I do that is to not buy new clothes. I watched an incredible documentary a couple of years ago, The True Cost, which really influenced the way I think about where I spend my money. I try really hard to shop in charity shops and to buy vintage, and to buy handmade and local where I can. All of my animals are made from repurposed fabrics – I shrink woolen jumpers and scarves in the washing machine to make wool felt for my bears and three of the killer whales are made from a pair of French Connection velvet trousers! This means that there is always a limited number of animals I can make of each fabric. The size of the animals are determined by the clothes I buy from charity shops, and I love that about the pieces. So far I have designed patterns for a snow bear, a grizzly bear, a blue whale, an orca and a fox.

What is the inspiration behind it all?

I think mostly I really adore making things for people. I love gifting beautiful objects to my friends and family, I love making people happy. Particularly at this time of year, I think we all get caught up in buying a lot of plastic rubbish that doesn’t last and is bad for the environment, and I think it’s great to offer an alternative to that for customers. The designs for this collection of animals is inspired by the north and the sea – creatures that survive and thrive in the wind and the snow.

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I’m super jealous about real makers and crafty folk – how did you hone your craft?

I can’t remember learning how to use a sewing machine but my mum always had one and would let me play with it. I became much better when my sister Minty taught me how to repair holes in jeans – I spent hours patching up my boyfriend’s jeans that were ripped to shreds! I realised that it was easy enough to make gentle alterations and mends to clothes, so I became more and more familiar with my sewing machine.

The main skill, though, once you’ve learned how to thread a machine, is patience. I am a very patient person and am able to sit for hours doing really boring jobs. Sewing well, I have found, is all about the preparation – pressing, marking and pinning. If you make a mistake, painstakingly picking out stitches without tearing the fabric is a challenge! When I’m tired or grumpy and rush my work it never turns out as well because I make silly mistakes. I think all crafters will say that the more hours you put into your craft, the better you get. Making your craft space a nice place to work means you will want to put in more hours.

I also saw your amazing design work – I was blown away by your style! How did you learn to do that?

Thank you! When I was studying in Sheffield I was part of an exhibition curation team, and we designed an exhibition called Fabricate held at Millennium Galleries in the city centre. We had reached a dead end with designing a flyer so I made some drawings and scanned them in. I opened them on Pages (Apple’s version of Word) and somehow figured out that I could draw a line and bend it, like you can on Photoshop.

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I have never had Photoshop on my laptop, but I found I could make these drawings on my computer using this free software. It’s basically tracing — I take an image that already exists and draw shapes on top of it to make a digital image. Again, patience is the skill — the drawings can take a long time to create and you have to just be able to work away at it and not get bored.

Who/what inspires you?

People that work from home! I’ve found it hard to get in a routine and not be distracted by house jobs. And it’s quite isolating – not like when you go into work and get to see and talk to all different kinds of people. So to the people who have figured that out: I have loads of respect for you! I think social media is hard work sometimes but I find loads of inspiration online – there is the world’s community of makers showing you that it can be done. Closer to home, I’m really lucky to know a few talented makers who don’t compromise their values and still manage to make some money. Hurray!

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What does 2018 hold for you Posy?

Scary question. Well I’ve got a busy few weeks making softies for Graft pop up in Hexham (open until 22nd December!)  I’ve hardly thought about next year! I do feel like there is potential here to continue making these little animals, which would be amazing — I feel like they are my thing that no-one else does. So I suppose there will be some research time — I think I need to figure out how to work from home, or else find a studio; as well as searching for opportunities to sell my work. I have another small business, Grow to Glow, which makes and sells natural skincare products — my business partner Pia has just gone on maternity leave so I will be looking after that project for a while too. I’ll be doing some design work for packaging and working on a range of healing balms — so I think 2018 is all about making and creating.

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Posy Jowett – creative onion and megababe. Posy – artist, creative, designer, maker, graphic designer, crafter, illustrator and also skin care brand creater….

Posy my absolute favourite creative onion of 2017.

Check out her new business, show her some social media love and until next time Culture Vultures.

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Artist Jim Edwards & Craig David Pub cat…..

Two weeks ago I attended Ouseburn Open Studios and was a true Culture Vulture– I took myself around all the galleries and called in to lots artist pals and of course chatted to lots of new creative folk and other attendees. I had a blissful conversation with an artist about the 90s and owning a type writer when I eventually own my own house (I want everyone to be able to type a message when they enter/visit).

Ouseburn Open Studios is such a fantastic vibed weekend – I also like to make sure I buy lots from artists and creatives whilst grabbing a drink in many of the lush bars and independents along the way. Hence my purchasing gets more and more along the way…….

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And I always finish (it’s traditional for me now!) in Jim Edwards studio on the Sunday afternoon and promise myself that when I’m grown up, I’m going to buy myself a Gateshead themed Jim Edwards painting. I love Jim Edwards work – it’s colourful, enthused talent and I always view it with a huge smile on my face – as every single piece to me, looks and feels like home. He depicts many lush scenes from the North East – some iconic, some comfortingly familiar and some perfectly stylised.

One of my favourite pieces of his – depicts Craig David. I imagine – 50% of you reading this, know exactly what I’m talking about and the others, probably think I’m talking about actual Craig David (even typing that makes me call out “can I get rewindddd!”). Craig David was a lovely pub cat – he was a regular lurker at the Free Trade Bar and his spot was on top of the Jukebox. He’d often swagger in and make himself at home or you’d go in for a bev and he’d be in his spot snoozing or watching the world go by……

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Craig David died this year and of course, there was an outpouring on social media. And when he died, I suddenly thought of Jim’s painting – which depicts a quiet Free Trade afternoon with Craig David absolutely in pride of place checking out the view of the Tyne. He’s forever immortalised in that picture. It reminded me why I love Jim’s work so much – real scenes, with real goings on filled with real detail. I love that painting!

So I thought I’d take Ouseburn Weekender as the perfect opportunity to catch up with Jim Edwards – find out more about him, his work and his style.

Hi Jim – right tell me about your journey into the arts?

I’ve always been interested in creating artwork. As a child, it was always the enjoyment of getting lost in a creative practice, and also for the praise that came from making a strong image, and being regarded as good at art.  I had two older brothers who were also good at art, and so the competitive nature between siblings challenged me to become better.

I concentrated on art throughout school, art foundation and a degree in illustration. After I graduated, I wasn’t sure how to continue a career in the arts.  I attempted illustration for a while, but it wasn’t for me.  Whilst working as a picture framer, I started to sell small paintings and drawings at a market on Armstrong Bridge (Jesmond Dene, Newcastle) on Sundays.  I tried out all sorts of work, abstract, surreal, figurative, but the thing that really took off were paintings of Newcastle.  I gave up becoming a picture framer, to give more time painting cityscapes, and I’m still a professional artist 18 years later.

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Tell me about your practice and your strong recognisable style?

I mostly paint contemporary cityscapes and landscapes, centred on the North East.

The style has slowly evolved over time. When I started, it was quite naïve in style.  I worked a lot with biro, with washes of acrylic paint.  I then used hairspray to bleed the biro colour through the paint.  It was an interesting affect I stumbled across by accident, but I stopped this method because it wasn’t good for my health.

For a while my style even went a little bit abstract, but the cityscapes started to become too unrecognisable; I like to play with colour and over exaggerate the light in my nightscapes, I have to build up several  layers of paint to get the desired tonal effect, making the city glow.  A slow process, but rewarding.

My work is strongly rooted in memory, how we remember a place, rather than a straightforward representation. I like to reimagine the cityscape, even if certain elements are forgotten or altered.

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What’s it like being on the Ouseburn creative scene at the moment? Your studio is beautiful!

I’ve been working in the Ouseburn for most of my career, hopping from one studio to the next. One of the earliest was at the Biscuit factory, followed by the Mushroom Works.  Then after a brief 8 month stint in Northumberland, I came back to 36 Lime Street, before taking on my own place at 59 Lime Street.

I couldn’t imagine having a studio outside of the Ouseburn, it feels like my creative home. It’s quietly paced, and feels like an escape from the city, even though it’s quite industrial.  Renowned as the cultural hub of Newcastle, it’s crucial to be here for the numerous open studios events that take place throughout the year.  This is where all the creative venues join forces and open their studio doors to the public.  Whether it’s the Ouseburn Open Studios or The Late Shows, both are valuable to my work.

It’s quite a lonely profession being an artist, which I don’t mind, because I love my own space. But it is beneficial to mix with other like-minded people, to work together of bounce ideas off each other.  So I’m often over at 36 Lime Street having a cup of tea with friends.

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How did you go about securing that studio space?

I spotted it was coming up for rent, so jumped at the opportunity to get it. It’s a huge jump in rent, to what I was used to at 36 Lime Street.  But the increase in visitors to my studio, with having on street access, has more than made up for it.  It’s a small, intimate space to work in.  And sometimes I don’t know if the space is a studio or a gallery, so sometimes it struggles to function as both; as long as visitors don’t mind the creative clutter when they pop in.

Any new work or projects you’re working on?

I’m currently working on a few paintings, trying to get them finished before Christmas; including a large canvas of the Ouseburn. I have a huge to do list of paintings, mainly because the ideas come far quicker than I can actually paint them.  And so I’m looking forward to making a start on some paintings of Cullercoats and the Lake District in the New Year, before getting round to everything else on the list.

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And what does it feel like – people coming into your studio and looking at your work?

It’s quite a strange one. It’s always amazing selling paintings, really spurs you on to paint more. Especially being able to meet the buyer and talk about your work, which you don’t normally get in a gallery situation.  The rhythm of creating a painting gets thrown, whenever someone comes in.  It’s surprisingly disruptive, and I probably produce a lot less work these days.  But I can’t complain, it’s important for my work, and I want people to pop in.  And if they buy something, even better!

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Next year – it’s the Angel’s 20th Birthday and also Great Exhibition of The North – obviously, your pieces champion the North East and landmarks – do you see an opportunity for yourself next year?

I’ve got an Angel of the North painting on my studio wall, right now. Hopefully the birthday celebration will encourage it to sell.  Who knows what will happen during the Great Exhibition of the North.  I’ll see if I can tie in my paintings somehow.  There may be an Ouseburn Open Studios event during the event.  I look forward to it, and hope it benefits the creative industries in the Ouseburn.

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One of my favourite pieces of yours is The Free Trade depiction with Craig David in it….. as a Free Trade lover and prolific cat cuddler – it always made me smile and I’m super happy his legacy lives on forever in that piece.

I do like The Free Trade painting too, reminds me of the lazy days spent in there, before children, enjoying a pint. And yes, Craig David pubcat lives on in the painting.  I also like the window view, almost giving a painting within a painting.

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You manage to have successfully develop what I’d class as a commercially sustainable practice – do you have any advice for other artists currently trying to?

I think it’s crucial to know how to position yourself, to know if there’s a gap in the market, and can you create something to fill it. When I was a picture framer, I gauged the sort of paintings people were buying, and I thought there was a lack of cityscapes and landscapes in my style of painting.

You’ve also got to be stubbornly determined in your pursuit; have a fire in your belly to see it through, and not be too distracted by what others think or do.

What’s next for Jim in 2018?

Lots more art and getting through that to do list of paintings. Exploring more, and painting places in the North East I haven’t got to yet.  I really want to get round to painting more of Durham and Hadrian’s Wall, when I have a free moment.  Ouseburn Open Studios returns in March, and the Late Shows in May, plus other events through the year.

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Well thank you Jim – lush to catch up with you! Jim’s Studio is located at: 59 Lime Street, Ouseburn, NE1 2PQ and open Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 4.30pm and Saturday, by appointment – it’s certainly a must see for Culture Vultures and check out his work online too via his website – I just love it so much. And if like me you can’t quite afford a big picture painting – there are lots of prints and greetings cards you will be able to afford!

And of course, big love to Craig David pub cat – the cultural scene misses you!

Till next time Culture Vultures!

Amy Lord; live art, brain-feeding & 90s at Our Time.

Amazingly talented people walk among us often hidden and unheard….I’ve really learnt that a lot recently. Not all creatively talented people call themselves artists – they are ordinary people, in everyday jobs and yet, they have talents so unbelievably amazing at their fingertips.

And often no matter, how engaged you are in the cultural sector and how “aware” you think you are – I’m always surprised when there is someone, doing something so amazing and fantastic and I didn’t know about it!? Sounds ridiculous – but I prize myself in being in the know and the now – so when I stumble across someone new and exciting, I’m both blown away but a little bit cross at myself – how did I miss this!?

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I first heard of Amy Lord, when a friend of a friend told me about this “project” in Newcastle taking over a townhouse and how they were exploring happiness and we had a mega long conversation about what exactly happiness is and how society has this version of happiness and zen……and I’m just over here, being ridiculous, not getting up at 5am and doing yoga and even when I’m happy, my world is chaotic.

So, this townhouse take over culmination was over Late Shows weekend – which is my busiest weekend – I never get to experience the Late Shows as an attendee – I work it and usually on the Gateshead side. So obviously, I missed Amy’s ‘Experiments in Happiness’ take over.

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Fast forward a few months and I’m sat listening all about the progression of this year’s Juice Festival and Our Time – Helen who is programme director said the ultimate which immediately secured my project buy in…..

“Rachel – so there is Amy Lord, she’s this mint visual live artist….she’s doing this Art House piece and you’re going to love it, it’s all about the 90s”.

Boom!

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So being the creep, I am – ultimate stalker mode started and what I discovered was an artist that is creating and doing very interesting work in collaboration with some of my favourite people at the moment in the North East Cultural Sector.

I really like visual live art – it combines some of the elements I love most about sculpture but encourages an evolving engagement. Amy describes it as a “multi-textured and layered encounters and experiences” and I think it sums it perfectly. So many elements and things brought together – with a strong focus on visual……

As someone with a passion for events – I really like Amy’s work from an space curation and the facilitation and provocation of audience experience…… that really excites me and I’d love to work with her in the future.

So now over to Amy…….

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Who are you?

Hello! My name’s Amy, I’m 31 and I’m from Northumberland! (In the style of Blind Date).

I’m an artist but I also run an events company on the side called Lemonade and Laughing Gas. I’m currently living in between London and Newcastle. I spend a lot of time on the Virgin Trains East Coast train route at the moment…

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Tell me about your arts practice?

I make live art. For me, this means creating anything from an interactive installation, a game, a video, a crafting activity and a performance. I always want my work to be personal, political and to not shy away from difficult or challenging subjects. Sometimes my work can be more about the process than the end result. I love working with different groups of different ages to capture the full spectrum of human experience.

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Tell me about a recent project?

My latest big project in the North East before my Our Time commission was Experiments in Happiness. I took over an empty townhouse on Grey street and filled it with installations and experiences exploring ideas around happiness and mood. 600 people turned up over 2 days – the interest in the project totally blew me away and has just made me want to do more stuff here.

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Everyone has a super interesting story about becoming an artist – tell me about your journey into Arts?

I’ve always got a buzz out of making things from a young age, but I think my first step into the arts was Uni. I was lucky to get into LIPA (Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts) and studied Theatre and Performance Design. Although I loved the course, I knew I didn’t want to be a theatre designer at the end of it. A tutor there introduced me to live art and more experimental theatre in my final year, and I was hooked. My first solo project was a work in a derelict restaurant about the media and pressure on body image for women (2007).

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Piece of advice for someone thinking about a career in the arts?

Try and build in time for ‘brain feeding’. It may feel indulgent but if you don’t keep seeing stuff, reading things and learning new skills, sometimes the inspiration well can start to dwindle!

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Why did you apply to be a part of Our Time?

I liked the structure of the ‘mini commission’ – creating something quickly for one night only appealed to me, as well as the positive feelings about the area and the past Team Juice were wanting to emphasise.

Tell me about your commission?

Research is often at the core of the work I make, this commission is no exception! I spent 3 days rummaging around news archives and microfilm to find good news stories from the 90’s – specifically in Newcastle and the North East.

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Then, we had a workshop with Team Juice to whittle these down and find out what was most interesting. We did some creative thinking and finally, shot some video on smartphones to make into a film that will be projected on a loop throughout the evening.

We’ve chosen to show the film in this bonkers tunnel in the museum, which we’ll be filling with 90’s music to help transport people back to that time!

What was the inspiration?

DIY culture/the contrast between technology in the 90’s and now.

The idea could have happened for any decade really, but I chose the 90’s because not only is it having another moment in the sun but it’s also the first decade I’ve felt properly nostalgic about, as I was 15 when the millennium arrived!

I used to think people obsessing about the 70’s and 80’s were just living in the past, but now I totally get it! Nostalgia and remembering those super important formative years can be totally delicious! As long as you balance it with living in the present too…I also can’t pretend I wasn’t influenced by watching Sing Street.

What do you want attendees to take away from your installation?

Fun. And maybe realising how many amazing things happened in the 90’s for our region.

Top 5 90s songs?

Wow, there are so many. Here’s some of the top of my head (that may have found their way onto the soundtrack!)

Dreams – Gabrielle

What’s Up – 4 Non Blondes

Another Night – Real McCoy

Sunshine After the Rain – Berri

The Whole of The Moon – The Waterboys

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Favourite 90s moment?

When everyone thought the world was going to end once we got past midnight on New Year’s Eve 1999.

Have you seen the rest of the Our Time line up? What bits are you most excited for?

I’ve worked with Zoe Murtagh on my last project so obviously I’m a fan of her, and am looking forward to seeing what she’s created with ‘It Was Once A Dream Interactive Trail’. I also create a lot of multi-sensory work so I’m looking forward to getting in the Von Tuur Salon.

Also generally, we’ll be in a museum, at night, with a bar…absolutely winning!

Well, I’m just such a fan of so many things Amy said….. I’m all about trying to make time for “brain feeding” and the 90s is absolutely my jam……

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Thank you Amy….. I’m super excited to see and experience your piece.

I will be at Our Time at Great North Museum on 21st October – you’ll probably find me lurking and obsessing over Amy’s 90s piece and involuntarily breaking out into song and dance when ‘SunShine After The Rain’ comes on…..

Culture Vultures – this is the ultimate Culture Vulture event….. don’t miss it or Amy’s lush installation.

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Moth Studios: a studio putting taxidermy and entomology at the heart of the creative community in the North East!

It’s been a while since I blogged….I’ve missed it. I’ve missed seeking out new things, people and places to tell you about. It’s not that I didn’t seek them out – of course I did, it’s what I do and my notebook is as always, full of scribbles, names, ideas and things I’m looking forward to exploring in the coming months. It was more, I just didn’t have the time or the energy to do anything……

Those who really know me, know I’ve worked my socks off for the past 6months – I’m a prolific workaholic and an addicted culture vulture……but this year has just been something else – life in the fast lane, times a million. I don’t even know how it’s September or how I got through that workload, but it is and I did and I’ve worked on some fantastic projects so far and many more to come…..

I’m desperately trying to stand still and look back and reflect – but my head is just buzzing with all the ideas I’ve put on the backburner, collaborative opportunities I’m just itching to explore and new beautiful projects, that are at this point all mine to run free with…..

So even though I’ve had my head down to the ground, I’ve been watching, taking things in and for some, as creepy as it sounds (and I’m pretty good at being creepy), I’ve been admiring from a far. And if during this period of living amongst tornados of colliding priorities and projects, you have made me sit up and take notice of what you’re doing…….well you’re obviously doing something right.

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Have you ever had love at first sight moment? You get butterflies, you’re consumed, confused, overwhelmed and the world really does stop and skip a beat….. I had a moment like that when I stumbled upon Moth Studios in Ampersand Inventions earlier this year. Their studio wasn’t even open but I was peaking through the glass (told you I was good at creeping!) and it looked like the most interesting, weird, bizarre and absolutely captivating studio to work in. From the work space, it screamed that something really exciting and different was going on – a very different creative offering………

It was a bright space, full of animal and insect touches – think Tim Burton-esque meets very talented taxidermy. Of course, I’ve always been fascinated by taxidermy and entomology– the practice, the art of it and how it has gradually moved from quite a niche thing to infusing other types of art forms – especially stop-motion animation but I’ve not really had that much exposure to it. However, their studio managed, whilst being full of dead things, to feel absolutely full of life and energy…..

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My Ampersand tour guide at the time was all round megababe Melanie Kyles, who told me, that Moth Studios offer workshops and taxidermy sessions…… This peaked my interest absolutely and the more I thought about, the more it made absolute sense that this studio enabling people to experience taxidermy and entomology should sit right at the heart of this creative community.

As you know, the Culture Vulture is allllll about new things, different things and even bizarre things and Moth Studios is providing an offering that is so different and an experience like no other – so this is right up my street. And it’s not just me who thinks so – through-out this busy period my social media has been full of people from the North East championing their work and attending their workshops – from tiny skull sessions, to butterfly pining, to taxidermy…. I’m certainly not the only one fascinated and intrigued by this artist studio and exactly what goes on inside its doors……..

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But for this Culture Vulture – it’s the processes behind the finished items that really interests me and the symbolic nature of the pieces, their silhouettes and the slightly gothic nature of the materials being worked with…….and so my love at first sight with Moth Studios started – at first of course, from a distance and now, well I’m head over heels and I just had to find out more so I caught up with Founder, Sherene Scott who started this adventure in 2014…..

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So hello Sherene! Tell me about Moth Studios? Who are you? What is it all about?

I’m Sherene Scott, director and owner of Moth Studios. We are a contemporary ethical taxidermy studio located inside Newcastle city centre.

What was the inspiration behind starting it all?

I am an artist and taxidermist; I’ve had formal training, from Newcastle University and around the UK. The inspiration for Moth began in 2010 whilst I was still a student; I began training in taxidermy and I had an amazing interest for death and preservation; as strange as that may seem. My passion came to light when I realised it was a dying art form, the skill involved and particularly that it is a male dominated field of work.

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How did you end up residing in Ampersand Inventions? I’ve peaked through the doors of your studio when I visited and holy moly, it’s a beautiful space!

I joined the Ampersand ‘team’ before the space was even erected, as I had friends that were resident artists and directors of the spaces. So you could say I was there from birth and build!

“Birth and build” – I really like that! Here in Ampersand you’re surrounded by other creatives and artists and the building as a whole, all with different backgrounds and practices etc; how does that influence you?

It’s a warm yet very professional feeling working so closely with other artists, designers and small businesses. We all have each other’s backs and we’re never short of giving and receiving ideas, advice and networking whilst we are “living together”.

Do you think taxidermy is making a real come back – it seems quite fashionable at the moment and gathering interest?

I think in the last few years, there has been a complete revival and resurgence in taxidermy. It’s an amazing feeling to see people interacting, enjoying and educating themselves with the idea of AND physically getting involved with life, death and anatomy.

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There also feels like there has been a big shift from people seeing it as a technical process but something not often openly talked about or featured in a “cabinet of curiosities” to now being much more mainstream, with greater interest in both the process but also in it as an art form? Do you feel that too?

There has indeed been a shift in the way people see taxidermy… I.e. no longer only in museum displays, curiosity cabinets and dusty old traditional taxidermy with complicated dioramas.

Now because we have so many taxidermy laws and there are no longer illegal ‘trophy rooms’ for silly status value; I would like to think we no longer see taxidermy as a bad practice, but seen as beautiful, artistic and ethical pieces of natural beauty, with the dioramas now being your own home, space or a unique 21st century touch.

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Tell me about some of your upcoming workshops – they are really unique and interesting? And how can people book onto them?

Moth Studios hosts many workshops and classes alongside their own work and online shop. We have beginner’s taxidermy and entomology (insect pinning) classes throughout the whole year!

Autumn/winter season is very popular for Moth… We have classes ranging from bugs to mice to squirrel, skull decorating, birds and even our specialised workshops themed around Halloween and Christmas, where we will be having bauble and wreath gift making evenings!

All of our up and coming classes are posted on our Facebook events page and I can be contacted directly via email contact@mothstudios.co.uk to get booked onto a session.

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Where do you source your materials from?

All of Moth Studios specimens and skulls come from responsibly sourced donations and finds from various different people, rangers, aviaries, farms and so on.

Do you take commissions?

Moth Studios does take commissions and projects; mainly specimens that have been found or that Moth already has. However, I do not commission pets…….

Do you have any new projects on the horizon and what’s next for Moth?

We have many exciting projects on the horizon and 2018 will see a whole new class list, new works and entire new collection in our shop. We will also be touring Moth Studios classes to exciting external locations in the North East and down south!

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Well that sounds massively exciting, thank you Sherene and if like me, you want to check out one of their classes – well why not come along with me and be my date…..I really fancy something Halloweeny or a Christmas wreath….get in touch and let’s do it.

Keep in touch with Moth via; Instagram: moth_studios , Facebook: Moth-Studios , Email: contact@mothstudios.co.uk , Website: mothstudios.co.uk or No: 07958658009.

Until next time Culture Vultures…..

 

 

GemArts Masala Festival 2017; a South Asian cultural infusion of a festival……

Working in Culture within the North East is possibly the best sector in the entire world to work in; it’s just mint! The ideas, the events, the projects, the people and beyond. As a none people loving people person, I really finding my little space in the world, with such brilliant people.

The Cultural sector in our region is just so diverse – I’ve never experienced anything like it. The cross fertilisation of ideas, partnerships and collaborations and the ever emerging willingness to work together culminates to ensure an exciting bubbling richness of lush things and people.

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GemArts and Sunderland Stages present Gods & Mortals at Sunderland Minster

The sector is also very close knit – you can attend any event really and see a smattering of friendly creative faces smiling, championing you and your projects and attending the things you do. It’s a like a secret club of lushness…… the people you work alongside or attend their things and champion, very easily move from project partner or such and such from that organisation….and become friends. Real friends and people who you celebrate every cultural moment with.

Sinead from Gem Arts is one of those people (and in fact really the whole Gem Arts team….but Sinead really likes cats and is quite ridiculous like me, so she’s my favourite). I’ve known of Gem Arts for some time and championed them for as long as I have worked in the cultural sector….. their Mini Mela was my induction into working with a large scale cultural children’s event.

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GemArts is a dynamic arts development organisation presenting South Asian arts. They produce and programme new and exciting culturally diverse arts, by creating and developing high quality concerts, events, festivals, workshops and commissions with regional, national and international artists. Every event I’ve attended has been a cultural hot pot and celebration of South Asian diversity and learning about respective cultures.

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Last year they launched Masala Festival and I had the pleasure of championing it as part of Gateshead Arts Team and of course, as Sinead’s mate Horts. So as we are literally about to jump into the second Malasa Festival (deep breaths Sinead and team – it’s going to be mint!), I thought I’d take the opportunity to catch up with her and find out what this year has in store for the region alongside digitally championing to my fellow Culture Vultures what a cracking week this is going to be…..

Well hello Sinead, so first up; what is Masala Festival?

Masala Festival is the North East’s very own, award winning, South Asian Arts Festival, bringing a mix and blend of the finest art and artists to the region for 7 days in July starting on 17th July.

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How many years has it been running and what kicked it all off?

GemArts launched Masala Festival in July 2016, offering a truly eclectic programme, spanning traditional and contemporary arts. After 16+ years presenting diverse arts in the North East, we decided it was time to put our expertise to good use, and create a brand new Summer Festival, showcasing artists from the UK, South Asia and beyond.

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This year the Masala Festival programme explores partition, migration, globalisation, identity, heritage, tradition and modernity, and marks the 70th anniversary of Independence for both India and Pakistan, something we were already starting to think about in 2016.

You won a Culture award for last year- tell me what that was like?

Recognition is the icing on the cake, alongside the incredible support we continue to receive from participants, audiences, trustees, volunteers, sponsors, partners and local communities, to whom we are hugely grateful and celebrates the creative talents of artists from the region, across the UK, South Asia and beyond.

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It was a joy to collaborate, connect and celebrate with thousands of people from across the region at our first Masala Festival, and we can’t wait to do it all again.

Receiving an award for something your team is truly passionate about is a dream come true, and has given everyone an even stronger drive to continue championing creativity and diversity at every level, supporting young and emerging artists, and offering people from all backgrounds and ages, community groups and schools, engaging opportunities to take part in our culturally rich and diverse arts offer.

So… now 2017; what’s coming up for Masala?

This year’s Festival (17th-23rd July) will ramp things up, building on our award success we’ve been even more ambitious, and added exciting collaborations and takeovers to last years list.

GemArts has commissioned work from celebrated companies and artists  and the programme is packed; award winning poetry readings (Daljit Nagra: Heritage and Identity), specially curated short film programmes (Changes), celebrations of Sikh soldier’s music tradition and contributions to the First World War (Sacred Sounds), leading choirs from India (Gandharva Choir), two nights of powerful theatre (No Dogs, No Indians), Masala Festival takeovers and collaborations (Q Festival, Trinity Square and Dabbawal), Mini Mela family fun days, Indian storytelling shows (Henna),  talented musicians fusing jazz, electronic and Indian classical music (Sarathy Korwar), folk music and dance (Rajasthan Heritage Brass Band),  film screenings (The Jungle Book, Ghandi), exhibitions (AURORA by Jayamini de Silva), food events (Biryani Club), fantastic workshops (Bollywood dance, Meditation and Yoga), talks and demos (including GBBO contestant Chetna Makan) and lots more……

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What should I not miss out on?

We think you should attend everything, but there probably aren’t enough hours in one person’s day. Three events we know the Culture Vulture will really enjoy would be;

SACRED SOUNDS – A national project called Sacred Sounds, which tells some of the largely forgotten stories of British India’s role in the First World War. Using archive footage, letters, photos, music and poetry, SACRED SOUNDS is a multi-art form performance which explores Sikh musical heritage and traditions, which soldiers took with them to the battlefield.

HENNA INDIAN STORYTELLING SHOW – As part of our Q Festival takeover we’ve invited international storytellers Peter and Gorg Chand to tell a very special story. On the eve of a wedding a young bride-to-be is having henna applied to her hands. As the patterns emerge, the stories begin to unfold… love, loss, betrayal and Bollywood! Plus GemArts Henna artists will be on hand to create beautiful designs for any of our audience who want them.

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NO DOGS NO INDIANS – A powerful new play from Siddhartha Bose. Three intertwining stories, spanning decades, explore the effects and legacy of the British in India in a powerful new play to mark the 70th anniversary of independence.

I’m always up for trying something new and out my comfort zone- do you have any recommendations?

CHANGES: stories on the edge will certainly make audiences ask some serious questions, and think long and hard about the world they live in and the resilience of people. Following last year’s successful ALIVE film programme, we’ve teamed up with creative producer Bobby Tiwana again, who has curated a stunning line up of short films for CHANGES; a programme of lives on the edge – personal and political conflicts test human resolve.

My little mini Culture Vulture Beck (one of my best pals little boys) – he’s really into trains, stamping his feet, stairs and exploring- anything for him and his lush fam?

There is plenty for mini Culture Vultures and their adults to get involved in during Masala Festival. We’re starting our Q Festival takeover with Bollywood dance classes for ages 2+ from 9am, and then from 11am we’ve Stories from the Punjab and Beyond for ages 5+ , a fun, interactive, and lively session of Indian tales.

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Part of our Movies at Masala programme with the Jam Jar Cinema, shows The Jungle Book at 11am on Saturday morning.

Sunday sees the return of our popular Masala Festival Mini Mela, which last year welcomed more than 500 people throughout the day. Like all GemArts Mini Melas the day includes a range of drop in arts workshops, from Rangoli, Kite making and Silk painting to Bollywood Dance and Dhol drumming, plus we’ve invited an amazing group of musicians to really bring the space to life, as the Rajasthan Heritage Brass Band will perform throughout the day.

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Heard about the curry night at Arch 16 which obvs I’m all over that…..I like my curry to be an experience…..

BIRIYANI CLUB AT ARCH 16 – We love working with our friends and neighbours, and when we read about Arch 16’s curry clubs with Ashiyana Café we knew we had to chat Masala Festival with them. A tasty curry for less than £10, and GemArts DJs spinning the best bhangra hits, what’s not to like?!

CHETNA MAKAN CHAI, CHAAT AND CHUTNEY – As big fans of food shows, food cooking and food in general, we were over the moon when former Great British Bake Off contestant Chetna Makan was available to deliver a cooking demonstration during Masala Festival. Chetna will share stories from her travels around India for new cookbook, Chai Chaat and Chutney, and attendees will get to taste a selection of delicious street food recipes created before their very eyes!

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Well that’s all a little bit amazing isn’t it – so make sure you check out GemArts Masala Festival next week…..you’ll see instantly why  it won a Culture Award and how fantastic it is – every night a brand new experience of diverse lushness – so much to see, do and of course Culture Vultures, EAT!

So bye for now Culture Vultures and Sinead, well I’ll see you on the other side of Masala Festival…..

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The Culture Vulture xx

Are you in the Crafthood?

We all know I love small businesses….that’s a given right? Well what I love even more than that, is a small business that are absolutely owning and disrupting an established sector……And of course, what else could top trumps this? – well of course; an all-female run creative business….

Well hello there; The Crafthood….

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The Crafthood are a business that I heard about through other people (always a good sign) so I can’t claim they are my discovery, but I certainly am one of their biggest champions…. First of all what’s in a name? Well The Crafthood have a really good one, just by going to something I feel a part of their ‘hood! I love their name and branding…..Secondly, they are making crafting amazing, exciting, essential for the modern day lass and socially responsible….

Right up my street!

If you don’t know who the Crafthood are…. Well you’re going to over the next 12 months! They are one of the most exciting creative businesses; growing and thriving in the North East currently. Their offering is three fold; they run their own workshops within North East’s up and coming independents – as fantastically talented craftswomen, you’ll get a lush crafting experience like no other. Secondly, they sell a fantastic bespoke range of products; from cards, to notebooks to clothing, to bespoke lettering and signage – all with their lush Crafthood edge! Thirdly, they organise their own events or add value to a pre-established event (keep an eye out for their pop-ups).

The Crafthood invited me along to one of their Brush Lettering workshops as a punter in May 2017 and I absolutely loved it……so where to begin…..

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First and foremost, I’d like to say that The Crafthood workshops are for both artsy and crafty folk and others (like me!) – so for those that love crafting and trying new things in a new environment and taking time out just for you, to create; well their workshops are for you. However, if you’re like me and are massively creative but not at all “crafty”, well I can promise these workshops are for you too and you’ll love them.

 

I rocked up to their Brush Lettering workshop, I sat down with the other fellow participants and The Crafthood talked through our beautiful Brush Lettering pack, equipment, exercises and information. The first thing that hit me was the care to detail; everything I had was take away, beautifully presented and made me feel super excited to get started.

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We had 20mins of expert tuition and information (and lush cake and refreshments from Flat Cap Joes) and then we were ready to get started. What was stand out through-out the session was how inclusive the session felt, whilst being able to experiment, chill and get creative. In all honesty, I felt like I was taking time out for me, creating and absolutely loving it! I also was able to chat to other participants through-out the session – was lovely to hear more about them and their creative interests.

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Sharon and Kay (The master creatives behind Crafthood) chatted about their workshop portfolio, which currently consists of Brush Lettering, Soy Wax Candle-making and Modern Calligraphy. They also run their Crafty socials and attend events with add on mini taster workshops. For every workshop or organisation workshop booked, they book another workshop for a community group or charity– buy one gift one. It was lush to hear the “Wearside Women in Need” were benefitting from our brush lettering workshop…..

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When we got hands on with the brush lettering, we worked through lots of different exercises and Kay and Sharon (The Crafthood) were always on hand to guide and offer feedback.

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A lot of exercises were repetitive practicing of shapes and letters; the process of experimenting with technique and shape was really cathartic. As someone who struggles with detail and perfection, I actually found the process really freeing – being able to let go, make marks and just have a go without worrying about what things looked like…..However, I could not and still can’t master a “d”…… I will one day *shakes fist at the sky*…….

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We were working towards a sentence or word – of course, because I’m the Culture Vulture, I wanted to write my name and also CV in brush lettering; luckily no “d”s involved. I was massively surprised how easy it was to become engrossed with the letter shape and completely forget how to spell things…..so there were a few moments when I would look proudly at my work and see letters missing….. boo!

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As I got to the end of the workshop, I thought several things – firstly, I’d really enjoyed myself; I felt like I’d taken time out of the busy to do something lush just for me; this is something I so rarely do. Secondly, I’d learnt something new; I’m all about personal development and challenging myself – I felt walking away from this session that I’d actually developed a brand new skill and that was mint.

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Thirdly, that I’d defs continue this; the lushness of brush lettering is that you can do it anywhere and The Crafthood workshop sets you up nicely with everything you need so you can practice and do it often. I am now a brush lettering aholic (minus the letter “d”)!

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The Crafthood have a whole host of lush workshops, events and activities coming up – they are adding a new workshop to their workshop portfolio every season, so watch out for a developing programming……as always I will be championing them and attending – so check them out Culture Vultures and make sure you become a part of the C ‘Hood.

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Creative Start-up Shepherd Illustration…

The heart and soul of Culture Vulture is my passion for culture and arts in the North East……I’m on a cultural adventure to seek out and discover as many things and creative people as possible. I’ve built a business based around seeking the unfound and going out and about in the region…..literally my dream.

My starting point with artists and creatives is them as individuals; teasing out their story and perspective. I don’t just want to see an arts piece or performance; I want to experience it, understand it, question it and learn from in. I am fantastically lucky that in my day job and as The Culture Vulture, I get to meet an array of creatives and artists. I really get to know them and they become a part of the Culture Vulture network and family. I look out for them and champion everything they do……..what is so brilliant about meeting so many people and hearing their stories, is the different journey people have often taken to become an artist, a creative, a creative business, practitioner, a performer, designer….however, an individual sees themselves. And this is why I do blog interviews….to learn more , explore but also for you lovely lot………

So pleased to meet you Lauren Shepherd, lush creative business and recent start up – you will be able to meet her at the after-party at Newcastle Start-up Week……….

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Hi L, Tell me about Shepherd Illustration?

Shepherd illustration was born out of my accidental habit of drawing. Each art course, I have ever taken, be it fine art, spatial design or animation, I have always found myself focusing on drawing. Many art forms need so much equipment, where as to draw you just need a scrap of paper and a pen.

I like being quiet (this will come as a surprise to anyone who knows me as I talk…. Too much) but when I am on my own, I just love to be quiet; drawing offers me that sanctuary. I ended up with a bunch of drawings and wanted to do something with them; at first I found it really hard to focus on creating a product and still now, I realise I have gaps in my product range and I don’t focus on creating a card for every occasion. I like to give the customer chance to think for themselves and to become a part of the creative process. I’m still learning and I enjoy meeting people on this journey of turning my passion into a business.

Tell me about your journey setting up a creative business?

At first it was very exciting and still is; but it’s hard receiving knockbacks especially when I still work full time and come home after a long week to receive emails saying “no”.

It’s long hours and hard; sometimes you can’t see friends or fit in going to the gym. It’s really hard when you feel like no one sees your work and you spend more on products than you make. But then all of a sudden someone says “yes” and I get to do something extraordinary. For example I love to ski and approached Chalet Rosiere as I had heard they offer places to artists; they emailed back and were actually interested in commissioning me to do some work for them! I was totally overwhelmed but I grabbed the chance and spent the next 2 weeks creating 8 new pieces of work for the chalet which I honestly think are my best to date. 1 month later I was skiing in the Alps hosted by the wonderful owners of Chalet Rosiere.

Also if you’re creative you just can’t help it, you have to make!

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I really love your branding – what was the inspiration behind that?

My branding comes directly from my illustration. I wanted to create a brand rather than just a collection of drawings; I try and keep everything as stylized as I can. When I first started drawing everything was very macabre. But at that point, I was a young singleton drinking too much gin; I don’t think it’s any coincidence that the happier and more secure I have become in my life, the more romantic and positive my illustrations have become.

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Do you have an inspiration behind your style of work?

I am hugely inspired by botanical illustrations and Thomas Bewicks’ engraving. I feel my drawings are a modern interpretation of his engravings and share the same love of the countryside. This could be why I unintentionally draw solely in black ink. But I also feel again that it is the simplicity of only needing one sheet of paper and a pen to be able to start work. I often look at painters and feel a pang of jealousy when they are sat amidst huge boxes of paints and turps, paintbrushes, easels and canvases but then I remember that’s not where I currently am artistically.

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What about your love of dogs?

I love dogs! I am a dog person. My miniature dachshund isn’t my baby; but O truly think she’s a part of me. I got her when she was 10 weeks old and I was only 19. She has travelled the length of the country with me and looked after me much more than I have her. This year we have been together for 10 years and I can’t thank her enough for getting me through some very hard times. I’m very lucky to have a great team at YourFilm and my boss’s even let me sneak her into work so she can snooze beneath my desk.

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What was your journey into animation? You work for Your Film?

I came to study animation at Northumbria University and completed my degree in Motion graphics & animation BA. I was not necessarily the best person on my course and often felt I wouldn’t be able to find a job in the field, especially in Newcastle; a city I fell in love with and didn’t want to leave.  Through hard work I found some really great projects to work on even before graduating; this gave me enough experience and confidence to apply for my job at Yourfilm.

A few people applied from my course and I honestly didn’t know how the interview had gone, but only a few hours later Matthew rang me to ask me when I could start. I couldn’t believe it and screamed down the phone…. In hindsight I wish I had played this cooler. Fast forward nearly 4 years and I am still with the company. It is a fantastic place to work and being part of a small team means I have full control over the projects I work on and am constantly learning.

What’s next for you? Next project?

I currently only sell through a few independent retailers but would love to move into more shops and get my products noticed by a larger audience. Fingers crossed I will have some exciting news on the horizon soon. I have also been asked to be part of a new exhibition in York and am working hard on a new product range for the Thought Foundation.

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Creative, artist, animator, all round absolutely lush megababe gin lover Lauren Shepherd………..you can see more of her at Newcastle Start-Up Week………