GemArts Masala Festival 2017; a South Asian cultural infusion of a festival……

Working in Culture within the North East is possibly the best sector in the entire world to work in; it’s just mint! The ideas, the events, the projects, the people and beyond. As a none people loving people person, I really finding my little space in the world, with such brilliant people.

The Cultural sector in our region is just so diverse – I’ve never experienced anything like it. The cross fertilisation of ideas, partnerships and collaborations and the ever emerging willingness to work together culminates to ensure an exciting bubbling richness of lush things and people.

gem8

GemArts and Sunderland Stages present Gods & Mortals at Sunderland Minster

The sector is also very close knit – you can attend any event really and see a smattering of friendly creative faces smiling, championing you and your projects and attending the things you do. It’s a like a secret club of lushness…… the people you work alongside or attend their things and champion, very easily move from project partner or such and such from that organisation….and become friends. Real friends and people who you celebrate every cultural moment with.

Sinead from Gem Arts is one of those people (and in fact really the whole Gem Arts team….but Sinead really likes cats and is quite ridiculous like me, so she’s my favourite). I’ve known of Gem Arts for some time and championed them for as long as I have worked in the cultural sector….. their Mini Mela was my induction into working with a large scale cultural children’s event.

m5

GemArts is a dynamic arts development organisation presenting South Asian arts. They produce and programme new and exciting culturally diverse arts, by creating and developing high quality concerts, events, festivals, workshops and commissions with regional, national and international artists. Every event I’ve attended has been a cultural hot pot and celebration of South Asian diversity and learning about respective cultures.

gem9

Last year they launched Masala Festival and I had the pleasure of championing it as part of Gateshead Arts Team and of course, as Sinead’s mate Horts. So as we are literally about to jump into the second Malasa Festival (deep breaths Sinead and team – it’s going to be mint!), I thought I’d take the opportunity to catch up with her and find out what this year has in store for the region alongside digitally championing to my fellow Culture Vultures what a cracking week this is going to be…..

Well hello Sinead, so first up; what is Masala Festival?

Masala Festival is the North East’s very own, award winning, South Asian Arts Festival, bringing a mix and blend of the finest art and artists to the region for 7 days in July starting on 17th July.

 gem7

How many years has it been running and what kicked it all off?

GemArts launched Masala Festival in July 2016, offering a truly eclectic programme, spanning traditional and contemporary arts. After 16+ years presenting diverse arts in the North East, we decided it was time to put our expertise to good use, and create a brand new Summer Festival, showcasing artists from the UK, South Asia and beyond.

gem5

This year the Masala Festival programme explores partition, migration, globalisation, identity, heritage, tradition and modernity, and marks the 70th anniversary of Independence for both India and Pakistan, something we were already starting to think about in 2016.

You won a Culture award for last year- tell me what that was like?

Recognition is the icing on the cake, alongside the incredible support we continue to receive from participants, audiences, trustees, volunteers, sponsors, partners and local communities, to whom we are hugely grateful and celebrates the creative talents of artists from the region, across the UK, South Asia and beyond.

gem4

It was a joy to collaborate, connect and celebrate with thousands of people from across the region at our first Masala Festival, and we can’t wait to do it all again.

Receiving an award for something your team is truly passionate about is a dream come true, and has given everyone an even stronger drive to continue championing creativity and diversity at every level, supporting young and emerging artists, and offering people from all backgrounds and ages, community groups and schools, engaging opportunities to take part in our culturally rich and diverse arts offer.

So… now 2017; what’s coming up for Masala?

This year’s Festival (17th-23rd July) will ramp things up, building on our award success we’ve been even more ambitious, and added exciting collaborations and takeovers to last years list.

GemArts has commissioned work from celebrated companies and artists  and the programme is packed; award winning poetry readings (Daljit Nagra: Heritage and Identity), specially curated short film programmes (Changes), celebrations of Sikh soldier’s music tradition and contributions to the First World War (Sacred Sounds), leading choirs from India (Gandharva Choir), two nights of powerful theatre (No Dogs, No Indians), Masala Festival takeovers and collaborations (Q Festival, Trinity Square and Dabbawal), Mini Mela family fun days, Indian storytelling shows (Henna),  talented musicians fusing jazz, electronic and Indian classical music (Sarathy Korwar), folk music and dance (Rajasthan Heritage Brass Band),  film screenings (The Jungle Book, Ghandi), exhibitions (AURORA by Jayamini de Silva), food events (Biryani Club), fantastic workshops (Bollywood dance, Meditation and Yoga), talks and demos (including GBBO contestant Chetna Makan) and lots more……

m6

What should I not miss out on?

We think you should attend everything, but there probably aren’t enough hours in one person’s day. Three events we know the Culture Vulture will really enjoy would be;

SACRED SOUNDS – A national project called Sacred Sounds, which tells some of the largely forgotten stories of British India’s role in the First World War. Using archive footage, letters, photos, music and poetry, SACRED SOUNDS is a multi-art form performance which explores Sikh musical heritage and traditions, which soldiers took with them to the battlefield.

HENNA INDIAN STORYTELLING SHOW – As part of our Q Festival takeover we’ve invited international storytellers Peter and Gorg Chand to tell a very special story. On the eve of a wedding a young bride-to-be is having henna applied to her hands. As the patterns emerge, the stories begin to unfold… love, loss, betrayal and Bollywood! Plus GemArts Henna artists will be on hand to create beautiful designs for any of our audience who want them.

m1

NO DOGS NO INDIANS – A powerful new play from Siddhartha Bose. Three intertwining stories, spanning decades, explore the effects and legacy of the British in India in a powerful new play to mark the 70th anniversary of independence.

I’m always up for trying something new and out my comfort zone- do you have any recommendations?

CHANGES: stories on the edge will certainly make audiences ask some serious questions, and think long and hard about the world they live in and the resilience of people. Following last year’s successful ALIVE film programme, we’ve teamed up with creative producer Bobby Tiwana again, who has curated a stunning line up of short films for CHANGES; a programme of lives on the edge – personal and political conflicts test human resolve.

My little mini Culture Vulture Beck (one of my best pals little boys) – he’s really into trains, stamping his feet, stairs and exploring- anything for him and his lush fam?

There is plenty for mini Culture Vultures and their adults to get involved in during Masala Festival. We’re starting our Q Festival takeover with Bollywood dance classes for ages 2+ from 9am, and then from 11am we’ve Stories from the Punjab and Beyond for ages 5+ , a fun, interactive, and lively session of Indian tales.

gem3

Part of our Movies at Masala programme with the Jam Jar Cinema, shows The Jungle Book at 11am on Saturday morning.

Sunday sees the return of our popular Masala Festival Mini Mela, which last year welcomed more than 500 people throughout the day. Like all GemArts Mini Melas the day includes a range of drop in arts workshops, from Rangoli, Kite making and Silk painting to Bollywood Dance and Dhol drumming, plus we’ve invited an amazing group of musicians to really bring the space to life, as the Rajasthan Heritage Brass Band will perform throughout the day.

gem

Heard about the curry night at Arch 16 which obvs I’m all over that…..I like my curry to be an experience…..

BIRIYANI CLUB AT ARCH 16 – We love working with our friends and neighbours, and when we read about Arch 16’s curry clubs with Ashiyana Café we knew we had to chat Masala Festival with them. A tasty curry for less than £10, and GemArts DJs spinning the best bhangra hits, what’s not to like?!

CHETNA MAKAN CHAI, CHAAT AND CHUTNEY – As big fans of food shows, food cooking and food in general, we were over the moon when former Great British Bake Off contestant Chetna Makan was available to deliver a cooking demonstration during Masala Festival. Chetna will share stories from her travels around India for new cookbook, Chai Chaat and Chutney, and attendees will get to taste a selection of delicious street food recipes created before their very eyes!

gem2

Well that’s all a little bit amazing isn’t it – so make sure you check out GemArts Masala Festival next week…..you’ll see instantly why  it won a Culture Award and how fantastic it is – every night a brand new experience of diverse lushness – so much to see, do and of course Culture Vultures, EAT!

So bye for now Culture Vultures and Sinead, well I’ll see you on the other side of Masala Festival…..

gem6

The Culture Vulture xx

Invest into and start learning from NE culture & arts, oh and start paying them too!

No one actually makes a living as an artist, right? The cultural sector pays pennies? Go get a “proper” job? Actually the reverse is true, the creative sector and industries in the region are BOOMING…… people want bespoke, creative, individual…..there is the biggest movement to shop and support local and to reject the everyday for something more unknown, exciting, opportunistic and emergingly edgy.

I champion the entrepreneurial agenda, it’s in my blood (literally) and I love it but I really struggle with two issues…………. Firstly that creatives are often not viewed as legitimate business people and yet to see so many creatives launching themselves as a business and behaving more and more like a start-up is fantastic to see. Some of these businesses, it’s been that blend between day job and passion project testing, until opportunity……..without realising and a business is launched and they are trading; they’ve been through years and years of testing without realising. For artists, they have often been drawing or making for YEARS, putting their stuff on Instagram or selling at craft fairs, developing their product and skill set, until they launch…..often accidentally. Someone commissions something, asks to buy or like me, offers you a lump sum of money for a freelance project that gives you traction and a real starting point to launch and oh hello, I think there might be some kind of business here……….

Secondly, this intrinsic opportunity ethos for creatives to work for free; don’t pay them – just let them perform, suggest future opportunities that might lead onto paid work, as if engaging with them is a favour. From a business perspective; outlay of materials, time and then freebies offering, is crippling and removes the legitimacy. Should they be grateful for the opportunity…..as if you offering them a space or time is enough!?As a business think about the implications on the cash flow…….moreover, many creative start-ups are already under-pricing themselves, not factoring in their time, don’t value their service or practice in a similar way to a “product” or factor in materials so before you even think about “may be possibly” paying them what they are owed……they are already doing it for you for a brilliant deal.

This is so short sighted as I find the creative and cultural sector in the North East, as exciting as the Digital Sector at the moment, something to invest into and be a part of……however, there are key differences. There isn’t the investment available, there isn’t the capital and people don’t necessarily take creatives as seriously, as a business they can really understand. So what you have instead is individuals, independents and artists launching on a shoe string; they are resilient, constantly willing to learn, eager for feedback, out there networking, seeking opportunities, developing business models that are lean, mean and sustainable – they are the blueprint learning wise for a start-up business and entrepreneurs……instead of operating with big sales forecasts and massively unrealistic ambitions, they instead operate seeking collaboration, they show patience, evidence a longer term strategy to grow, can afford to keep going without sales or bookings, experiment and take mitigated risks……it’s not all or nothing, or go hard or go home; instead it’s about building something they love, care about and growing at their own pace incrementally on their own terms, making their own rules.

And you may say, well these creative businesses are not going to be the next “big” thing, they aren’t going to feature in Forbes and world isn’t going to change………I’d argue the other way….instead there is no entrepreneurial ego, they are real; a massive big business that had mega investment that people view as “proper” may never get off the ground and no one might ever hear of it, whereas a creative business located in the North East hundreds and often thousands know their name, the people behind it, buy from them, champion and support them….there is less “talking” about doing business and more of the making, creating and trying to get out there from day one……..  they have priced their product, sold it, met their customers, marketed it, submitted accounts and got their hands entrepreneurially dirty……… however, we could help them grow….just by paying them fairly for what they do and the service they offer.

To reflect that into my business; is the Culture Vulture going to make me millions?….probably not. Do I want it to? NO – there I’ve said it. I don’t want a massive business, I don’t want investment – I want my own entrepreneurial and creative sphere……….and I want to do what I love. That is my driver in entrepreneurship and I want to enable others to do the same.

So please don’t apologise or shy away from having a creative business, be massively proud – it isn’t any less “proper”…..Creative businesses usually have real values and passion at the heart………people, talented and excited brilliant people behind it. You have more real life business experience than most, so own that!

Creative businesses and people are the next big thing; there is a movement on going in the North East; I’m so excited to be a part of it………..will Creative businesses, artists and creatives change the world? YES they will…….because they re-imagine it, they challenge it, redesign it, express it, embracing all those aspirational entrepreneurial attributes – ability to handle uncertainty, resilience (anyone who has sold all day at a craft fair and sold nothing), ability to absorb learning and feedback and to build something that is not income dependent……. Their projects and activity happens irrespective of funding because they make it happen………….for most creatives, lack of funding is not a barrier to launch a business…….they assume there is no funding and they launch anyway, because their passion makes it almost like a compulsion………..

Moreover, their creative products bring smiles to people’s faces and they mean something to both the person who purchased it and (if appropriate) the intended recipient. That’s an emotional buyer connection that many businesses can only dream about.

More traditional entrepreneurs and start-ups have a lot to learn from creatives and artists………..so creative businesses and artists, respect them, learn from them, seek them and of course, pay them……

Easter Easter Easter holidayzzzzzz

It’s nearly Easter 2017 – can you actually believe it? I surely can’t…..

Well as always, I’ve rounded up some of the lushest activity for your minis for holiday season – so here it is Easter holidays in a nutshell………jam packed with activity in Gateshead for kids, families and young people; Gateshead has it covered with a diverse and interesting programme of fun cultural activity……

So get yer skates on and get planning for some fun things to do over the holidays for your mini Culture Vultures before these seasons are booked up….

Digital Makings: Family Music Workshop

Leam Lane Library, Saturday 8 April, 10am – 12pm

Start off your Easter holiday making some noise with us and spend a morning as a music producer; you’ll be using your favourite songs to help inspire you to create your own compositions using apps on iPads. Work with We engAGE on a variety of instruments and learn the art of designing a piece of music from scratch.

Suitable for ages 8+

Free – Book in advance

music tree

Design Your Own Easter Egg

The Gallery, Gateshead Central Library, Monday 10 April, 10am – 12.30pm

Drop in across the morning and join The Culture Vulture to design your own Easter Eggs and enter the competition. Go 3D and use a hard-boiled egg and create a sculpture, a character, or something eggcellently Easter related.

Or go 2D and design your egg from scratch like a pro. We’ll have LOTS of different materials for you to get your hands on.

Your finished designs can be entered into a competition which will be judged by three professional artists!

Suitable for all ages.

Free – just drop in.

easter2

Digital Makings: Wearable Tech

Gateshead Central Library, Tuesday 11 April, 2pm-3pm

Art and Science come together with our electronics maker activities – make your own piece of wearable tech. Become a digital fashionista!

Suitable for ages 8+

£5

To Book

easter4

Culture Camp: Soundscapes

Caedmon Hall, Gateshead Central Library

Wednesday 12 April, 9.30am – 4.30pm

A full day workshop with artist Ben Freeth exploring and creating soundscapes using digital techniques and coding. Unsure of what a soundscape is….well artists used them this year at Enchanted Parks and they are a regular thing on immersive theme park rides…..

Sounds pretty cool right? You’ll be learning how to use open source software to explore the Sound Library and Archives in Gateshead Library and take existing digital media and manipulate it to create your own unique locational compositions.

Suitable for ages 10-18yrs.

£20

To book

 easter5

Accidentally Minecrafted

Blaydon Library, Wednesday 12 April, 10am

Addicted to Minecraft? Well Blaydon Library have it covered with a whole host of Minecraft activities so drop in and get Minecrafted…..

Suitable for ages 8+

Free – just drop in (small charge may apply to come activities on the day)

More information

easter13

Culture Camp: Make a Play in a Day

Caedmon Hall, Gateshead Central Library, Thursday 13 April, 9.30am – 4.30pm

Back after last Summers’ smash hit success of a day…..join drama teacher David Raynor and The Culture Vulture to create an entire play in a day! You will experiment and explore a variety of acting and movement techniques, take part in confidence building workshops and character development, script writing, costume and staging activities.

This is a must for all budding Ryan Gosling and Maddie Ziegler ….

At the end of the day, you will perform the finished play to an audience of parents and Gateshead Culture Team.

Suitable for ages 8-14yrs.

£20

To book

Easter6

Design your own T-shirt

Birtley Library, Thursday 13 April, 11am

Well this session is for mini fashion designers in the making…..you’ll be making your own designs using stencils, paints, fabric pens or if you’re feeling super creative and brave, try free hand!

Suitable for ages 6+

£3

To book

easter8

St Mary’s Storytime

St Mary’s Heritage Centre, Friday 14 April, 10.30am

Pop down to the beautiful St Mary’s for a lively storytime for under 5s in a beautiful venue! Your baby or toddler will experience lovely immersive storytelling and a mini rhymetime. After the session refreshments are available too!

£1 – Pay on the door.

For more information and dates of other sessions

easter9

Culture Camp: Film Director Workshop

Caedmon Hall, Gateshead Central Library , Wednesday 19 April, 9.30am – 4.30pm

Join artist Karen Underhill to experience what it’s like being a Film Director; you’ll have the opportunity to create your own movie exciting and magic film trailer during this fun collaborative day. Learn how to work together to storyboard, act, record and edit a short fiction movie trailer.

Suitable for ages 8-14yrs.

£20

To book

easter10

Culture Camp: Animation on location

Caedmon Hall, Gateshead Central Library, Thursday 20 April, 9.30am – 4.30pm

Join animator Sheryl Jenkins to learn about the animation process and work with a mobile animation studio using animation apps, alongside digital photography, drawings and natural materials to create an animated film inspired by what we find in the library. You will then create an animation on a green screen to bring the library to life with using your favourite book characters. Mint!

Suitable for ages 8-14 yrs.

£20

To book

easter11

LEGO Drag Race

Caedmon Hall, Gateshead Central Library, Saturday 22 April, 11.30am & 1pm

Working with Richard Carter “Bricks Mcgee” build the fastest, meanest drag cars from our selection of LEGO elements, and race your creation against others as part of Maker Month – Maker Faire UK . Take your vehicle back to the pits and change the design to make your car faster, then compete in the grand final! Who will be victorious!?!?

There are 2 sessions to choose from please select your ticket for 11.30am -12.30pm or 1pm – 2.00pm

Suitable for families with children ages 6yrs+

Free – spaces limited so pre-booking is essential.

easter12

Get planning Culture Vultures…….

The Culture Vulture xx

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 17 Artist of the Month; Chris Folwell

New month, new projects and new artists to showcase…….so February’s artist of the Month is an artist, I’ve only quite recently had the pleasure of getting to know but in a variety of forms. I met him as an aspiring artist at The Late Shows so many moons ago….the exact year is hazy, as are so many of the Late Shows weekends when you meet so many wonderful people and do many lovely things. I saw his work as part of The Book Art project in 2012 and then our paths crossed again at last year’s Anime Attacks where he ran a flip book animation drop in workshop and again as one of the brilliant artists selected to join the 2016 Gateshead cohort of Make Art Happen.

Who is this artist you ask – well it’s Chris Folwell of course! Chris has been one of those artists that I’ve only ever met at events, or through their participatory work and collaborative larger scale projects. I’ve have quite been able to place him – he has just sprang up to me doing something fantastically creative.

chris1

Chris Folwell

Through his involvement on MAH, I got to know more about him, his practice, his background and his ambitions. I remember reading his application for MAH and I just loved it – full of creative project ideas, lots of passion and most importantly, real legs and capacity to get it off the ground.

So when I found out he was one of the Digital Makings Fore-edge artists and running some activity as part of the Gateshead Live programme – I was thrilled. So here he is in all his glory as The Culture Vulture’s February Artist of the Month…….

How did you get into “the Arts”?

I have a sneaking suspicion that a lot of people just fall into the arts and it was the same for me: I studied graphic design and hated how cold and removed it was, then animation and loved the hands on side but didn’t want to work at a computer doing CG.

tumblr_ob1nb9wu3v1s4sq73o1_400

My tutor there introduced me to printmaking and I got hooked – I did a top up year in fine art pretty much purely to play in the print room, then I bought a second hand press and barely went in to university afterwards! I had grand visions of graduating and becoming a full time illustrator and printer making work that sells out in an hour like some of the big names in the US. That never happened, but for a time I did make decent money selling my work at craft markets and I think that visibility served me well, though it eventually left me a little jaded with the arts and craft market scene.

chris6

A lot of the early ‘proper’ art work I did was through people who’d approached me at a market, then been surprised to discover that I had fingers in lots of pies outside of printmaking; I make a lot of objects out of cardboard just for fun: automata, zoetropes, small sculptures, and that’s lead to some interesting commissions (a 1:25th scale rocket and a life size polar bear). My animation degree has helped too, that led to artist Anton Hecht hiring me for one of his projects and he’s been a real patron of mine ever since, he taught me a lot about working in the arts professionally and spurred me on to pursue participatory art independently, something which has become the core of my practice.

Mostly I think it’s just interest in how things are made and what makes them work though that led me to being a full time artist; the first thing I do when I walk into a gallery is try and figure out how the artist made it and if it doesn’t impress me technically as well as visually then I feel cheated somehow. So that’s something I always tried to put into my work, seeing that look of wonder on people’s faces at the audacity of building a 30 foot tall rocket purely from cardboard is worth every second, especially when it’s a kid or a teenager: it takes more than you’d think to impress children!

How would you describe your practice?

Most of my practice now revolves around participatory art, though I still do make and sell prints, working with the public has become my focus. It starts with an idea for something I would really like to make or an issue I’m interested in, then I spend time figuring out how to involve people that would make the work more worthwhile.

chris5

For instance I’m currently collaborating with ceramics artist Judith Davies on the Out of the Box project, we’re exploring housing and community: how people would like to live given the freedom to choose. It’s my first real collaboration, and it’s the biggest project I’ve ever worked on but at it’s roots it just sprang out of our mutual interest in homes. At this stage it’s a pilot working with a handful of Gateshead youth groups to design homes and communities and build ceramic maquettes we’ll be exhibiting in Gateshead town centre, but we’re hoping to grow the project and commission other artists, I suppose the dream would be to use our findings to influence local housing development for the better.

Outside of big projects l do plenty of workshops, I started off doing simple arts and crafts workshops but that’s gradually evolved until now they’re usually as much about engineering as art.

What inspires you?

Science and science fiction has been a big influencer, in both my printmaking and participatory practice, I guess that’s the inquisitive part of me wanting to know how the world goes together. I read a lot, and listen to podcasts on a myriad of subjects but sociology is a particular favourite: it fits in beautifully with participatory art.

chris4

Otherwise I’m drawn to all sorts of things, I collect hobbies then discard them after a few months, I obsess over constructing imaginary homes, I’ve been building a boat on and off for 3 years. I suppose I find objects more interesting than people most of the time, and I love planning new projects, especially when I can go on a good walk and think them through.

Tell me a bit about your experience on Make Art Happen?

I think it was honestly the single most transformative period of my arts career. If you’re not familiar with Make Art Happen it’s a project designed by Helix Arts supported by Gateshead Culture Team to teach people how to deliver participatory arts programmes; it’s changed my whole outlook. My first involvement was through a commission; Bensham & Teams art, the group who hired me, came about through the MAH scheme then following that I was invited to apply for the next reiteration of the programme that would this time be aimed specifically at artists in Gateshead who wanted to expand their practice to include participatory art. It was hugely informative, they walked us through every aspect you could imagine and the support they gave us has been amazing. I met Judith Davies on the course and the Out of the Box project was a direct result of MAH, but more importantly it pushed me to examine the work I’d done so far and decide what a really wanted to do.

chris2

Until that point the route my career had taken was determined almost entirely by hunting paid work, which is fine but then you realise one day that you’ve had very little creative control over what you’ve been doing. That little push from Helix and the support allowed me to start a project entirely from scratch, and since then I’ve been planning projects until the cows come home – I’m sure some of them will never see the light of day, but if only a fraction of the things I want to do come to pass then I will feel like I’ve really achieved something!

chris3

If I could recommend one thing to anyone who thinks participatory art is something they want to add to their practice, even in a small way, it would be to email Helix Arts and tell them you would be interested in a Make Art Happen programme in your area.

Tell me about the Fore-edge exhibition? What is it?

Fore-edge paintings are a painting or drawing on the page edge of a book that’s hidden beneath gold leaf, if you twist the spine and fan the pages then it reveals this secret image underneath. It’s a medieval technique really, but the disappearing illustrations we’ve been working on started popping up around the 1600s and there have been a few small revivals but as far as I know there’s only one other person in the world still producing them. This was a chance to get a collection of artists together and produce a fresh take on an ancient technique, and the restrictions of the medium make for some really interesting results. Alongside the more traditional fore edge illustrations there’ll be a more modern twist on the hidden image, this time using augmented reality to display a secret visual in the books.

chris11

How did the project idea come about?

The fore-edge exhibition is one of Anton Hecht’s projects, he produces a lot of interactive art and pursues that in the projects he manages too, we’d previously done a project together illustrating books to turn them into flip books so when he stumbled across this technique it seemed like a natural development.

Tell me about your Fore-edge book Necronomicon? Did you select it?

I did yes, Lovecraft is just one of those writers that jumps out at you, he produced such a huge volume of work and was such a founding father of the horror genre it’s impossible to ignore him. It seemed a perfect fit for a work revolving around hidden imagery and mystery, I’m sure Lovecraft would have been interested in the technique. There is a little joke in there at his expense though, the man had a terrible habit of never actually describing the monsters in his stories.. since so many of his creatures are “indescribable” there’s only a hint of lurking beasties in my own illustration.

Tell me about the process you went through making your piece?

It’s quite a complicated process to prepare the books for a fore edge illustration, and an even more long winded process to gold leaf them, but that was the aspect that most appealed to me when Anton approached me. I think I went through 12 books testing different approaches and fine tuning techniques to get it just right!

chris14

If you reduce it to simple terms then you need to prepare the edge you’re going to decorate by sanding it smooth, then we twist the spine so the pages are fanned at least 45degrees and clamp it in a specially made press, similar to book binding press. Once it’s in there you can get painting or drawing but you need to be sure you don’t leave a residue on the surface, so acrylics are out but watercolour and markers work well. After that we pop the book back to normal and clamp it again then stain the edge with a red pigment called Armenian bole, which we can buff to a shiny finish with stiff brush. Lastly we apply a thinned down PVA glue and the gold leaf then you’re done! As part of the exhibition I’ll be running a workshop running through the full technique so please do come along and try it.

chris12

Have you seen any of the other works? Any favourites?

Yes, I ended up applying the gold finish to the majority of them so I’ve had a sneak peak. I think Mandeep Chohan’s book was my personal favourite, she was someone I was really keen to get involved in the project from the get-go; she makes fabulous collages so it was quite a challenge translating that technique to a fore edge illustration. We ended up using acetone to transfer images from photocopies, but that has formed the basis of the approach I’ll be teaching in the workshops.

What would you like people to take away from the exhibition?

Mostly just a little bit of wonder, this is something people have been doing for hundreds of years on some of the most beautiful books in history, so this is your chance to see some modern examples made by some of the North East’s finest artists!

chris-15

What’s next for you in 2017 onwards?

More of the same if I’m lucky; 2016 was a great year for my practice so I’m looking forward to all of the planning I started back then finally paying off. I’m working on a community arts festival for Bensham, Teams and Racecourse estates, I’ve got a fibreglass knight on horseback to paint celebrating the Battle of Lincoln, a wedding to plan, and you never know I might even finish that boat!

chris7

So fellow Culture Vultures have until 1st April to come and see the Fore-edge Book Trail at Gateshead Central Library…..make sure you do! Looking at the books and the detail, it makes me wonder when exactly was the moment we stopped, as a society, decorating our books to the extreme. There is just something SO magical about a leather bound book; with gorgeous illustrations and touches…..absolute works of art in their own right.

Peace and love. x

Killer afternoon, killer fiction, killer cocktails and a killer on the loose

Gateshead sure is a hive of activity and thriving at the moment; there are some amazing events coming up and I know you can’t make time for them all; but if you go to one thing this March – go to Killer Women at Gateshead Central Library on 12th March at 1pm.

This afternoon event is a must for all fans of crime fiction; killer crime fiction, killer cocktails and a killer on the loose! The killer afternoon focuses around ‘Killer Women’ a group of leading London based crime writers; Erin Kelly, Louise Millar, MJ McGrath and Kate Rhodes as they bring the world of crime fiction to life (and death!).

killer w

The topical discussion during Killer Women poses the question – “why do women love to read about grisly murders? “ Women are the largest demographic of crime readers; what is it about a good thriller that draws us in? I am an avid crime fiction reader myself and I know all too well how starting a new book can suddenly turn into hours lost and frantic devouring of the story. For me, it was Harlan Coben, that started off my addiction to the crime genre and I’ve read every single book and I love Myron Bolitar’s adventures; even if they are a tad ridiculous and far-fetched sometimes.

Ok so I will admit it – I love crime fiction; it’s not the violence or the murders especially that I like reading, although surely that must be part of it; it’s about the unfolding of a story that I honestly have no idea how it’s going to end. I love a good debate too – so I can’t wait to hear the author’s take on my crime reading addiction.

The afternoon will then go onto bringing crime fiction alive with a ‘Whodunnit’; we want you to bring out your inner Miss Marple and play detective as the Killer Women perform an exclusive murder mystery, complete with alibis, forensics and red herrings for you to solve. It’s going to be a difficult case to crack; but you’ll love trying!

marps

Geraldine McEwan as Miss Marple

Did I mention there are cocktails too? Of course – your crime solving mind needs a little tasty lubrication to get those cogs turning. We have got a special cocktail for the afternoon, for you to enjoy whilst racking your brains over the Killer Women crime and general knowledge quiz. Crime fiction fans this is your moment to shine; who will be crowned the winner?

If all of the above hasn’t quite persuaded you to come – then how about a little information about the authors at the event!?! There is nothing more brilliant than discovering a new crime author or meeting the person behind one of your favourite books; this afternoon is perfect for both. Moreover, each author has a very interesting journey into crime fiction writing and different story writing process; I can’t wait to hear all about it!

Erin Kelly is the fantastic author behind critically acclaimed psychological thrillers The Poison Tree, The Sick Rose, The Burning Air and The Ties that Bind. She has even brought her fiction to the small screen; in 2013, The Poison Tree became a major ITV drama starring My Anna Buring, Matthew Goode and Ophelia Lovibond. The book was listed as a Richard & Judy Summer Read in 2011; arguably one of the biggest signs of a brilliant book. Her fifth novel Broadchurch: The Novel, inspired by the first season of 2013’s mega-hit ITV series, is out now. If it’s anything like the TV show then it’s going to be brilliant.

Erin Kelly

Erin Kelly writer

Erin’s talents don’t just lie in writing amazing crime fiction; in her successful career as a journalist, she has written for newspapers including The Sunday Times, The Sunday Telegraph, the Daily Mail, the Express and The Mirror, and magazines including Red, Psychologies, Marie Claire and Elle. Her articles cover all sorts of issues including healthy, lifestyle, women’s issues and parenting; so keep an eye out when you’re next flicking through your mags.

Louise Millar is the author of City of Strangers, The Hidden Girl, Accidents Happen and The Playdate; all creepy psychological thrillers and she is busily working on her fifth book. Before turning to fiction, she spent 20 years working in magazines and newspapers, starting as a freelance sub-editor on entertainment titles such as the NME, Kerrang!, Empire and Smash Hits (remember the Smash Hits lyrics pages!?!), before crossing over into women’s magazines and becoming a senior commissioning editor at Marie Claire. In 2006, she left Marie Claire to start a business writing ‘ordinary people’s memoirs – appearing on BBC’s The One Show to promote it – while writing freelance features for Psychologies, the Observer, the Guardian, Stella (the Telegraph), Stylist and Marie Claire, and starting work on The Playdate.

louise millar

Louise Millar – writer

Our third author for the evening, is an Essex girl after my own heart; ambitious, wild, loves to travel and decided against a conventional career after a period of soul searching; Melanie McGrath. The Bone Seeker, The Boy in the Snow and White Heat are thrilling chilling crime novels that need to be added to your list of crime friction to read (may be with a light on – just in case!).

melanie 3

Melanie McGrath, writer

Melanie is a full time writer and her work extends passed crime fiction; she has written several non-fiction books depicting her love of travelling, she has written for TV and radio and she is also a journals. A true write-aholic one might say!

I can’t wait to ask Melanie how she changes her writing style between so many genres and contexts – what a talent!

mcgrath2

 

Our final author for the Killer Women afternoon, is none other than Kate Rhodes; another highly accomplished author who has a pHD in the playwright Tennessee Williams, a qualified English Teacher that has taught both in the UK and USA and a published poet!

Starting to write crime fiction Masterclass

Kate Rhodes, writer

Her love of crime began with her reading Brighton Rock, by Graham Greene and she went on to write crime fiction publishing five books. Her most famous work is The Crossbones Yard, her first novel and the first in the Alice Quentin series.

kate rhods - cross

Kate is a regular at crime and writing festivals and loves talking to audiences; so make sure you ask lots of questions; she’s a pro!

See, I told you they didn’t have the background you’d expect for a crime author! Teacher, fashion writer, doctorate, traveller, Daily Mail columnist and all mums with young children!

What an afternoon Killer Women is going to be so get your tickets now before they sell out and they will!

A Killer afternoon, killer fiction, killer cocktails and a killer on the loose!