Sculpture Day 2016: Game ON!

It is very nearly Sculpture Day…..it is THIS Sunday, starting at 11am in Saltwell Park, Gateshead.

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So how are going to approach this year’s theme Games? Even if you’ve been before but especially if you haven’t, I want to make sure that you get the most out of the day and build something fantastic!

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I love this year’s theme Games; it is so open to interpretation! But I’m going to give you some ideas to get you started thinking – You could build;

  • Something from the Olympic games
  • A level from a retro game – eg: Sonic.
  • Your favourite Pokemon character.
  • Take an idea from a Computer game; e.g. Mario Cart, Grand Theft Auto or the Simms.
  • Something board game inspired e.g. Monopoly, Scrabble, Connect four, Hungry Hippos, Guess who or a 90s favourite of mine; Dream Phone!
  • App games – Candy Crush, Subway Surfer…
  • Card games – poker inspired or exploding kittens.
  • School games – e.g. something Sports day related, What’s the time Mr Wolf, Red Rover or Tag.
  • A 3D reimagining of your current favourite Virtual Reality game.
  • Fair games – e.g. Hook a Duck.
  • Other games such as bowling, bowls, Pool, Snooker…..

I could go on, the list is simply endless and I can’t wait to see what you guys get building this year!

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I thought I’d ask the experts for a bit of advice that may help you get building….. I spoke to Karen Rann- A Sculpture Day sculptor, Anna Pepperall – Gateshead Public Art Curator, Adam Taylor –Sculpture Day addict and event’s manager and Jen Douglas – Gateshead based artist and sculptor. I gathered their hints, tips and insights to give you a helping hand to get started…..

What are your top tips for Sculpture day 2016?

Adam: Make it a family/group activity, everyone chipping in ideas, agreeing on a plan, choosing wood, and then building.

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Anna: Wear Warm clothes, and thick shoes/boots; bring lots of food, and your own hammers!

Jen: Either ‘ go with the flow’ and wait till you arrive to think about the Sculpture Day theme or, have a think about the theme beforehand, brainstorm ideas that you can bring along to work on with your family or group of friends you come with so you have starting points for what to make.

Right – so we’ve got lots of wood, they’ve got their tools – what is the best way to get started?

Adam: It’s always good to have a good plan, and think about how the various bits of wood are going to be nailed together.

Anna: Talk to Staff on the Info desk, look at a storyboard for inspirational ideas , ask an artist, or join a group already working on something.

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Karen: Think about framework, creating a good ‘bone structure’ it’s fun to save adding all the little details till the end.

Jen: If you get stuck for ideas there are Sculptors on hand to give you inspiration and get you started. Think through which of these ideas will work in 3D using wood and nails…. Some things might work better than others.

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Is it best to plan your sculpture before you start or just “go with the flow”?

Anna:  Either- some people prefer to come with an idea but often it’s good to look around and get inspiration, or from the Artists/Storyboard.

Jen: It’s sometimes useful to think about making the sculpture from the base up – work as a team/family to decided who works on which section of the sculpture so everyone has a job! With lots of different types of wood different lengths/thicknesses etc. might suit different sections to your sculpture so a plan may be useful.

Karen: Depends how you like to work it could be you spot an enticing bit of timber at that gets the imagination going, don’t forget to look at the school’s work for inspiration.

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For the Sculpture Day veterans or newbies out there, who attend year on year what would your advice be on approaching this year’s theme “Games”?

Adam: Plan something original!

Jen:  When you’ve decided what you want to make gather together some pieces of wood and lay them out on the floor so that you can start to ‘map out’ your sculpture and see how each piece might join together to form your 3D masterpiece. You can always tweak and add more pieces of wood to make the work more elaborate.

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It’s as much fun to just tinker away with the wood and create something quite unique and un-related to the theme – that is fine too Sculpture Day is a fantastic experience to have and everyone who comes along has fun!

Karen:  Don’t always go with the first idea, it may be a tricky one to transform into 3d, there’s so many types of games and a little time spent playing with ideas might lead to something really novel and fun to make.

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Well it’s over to you Culture Vultures; I’ll see you in the Grove, in Saltwell Park on Sunday from 11am.

Game on!

Jane Gower – Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month August

Well Summer is drawing to the end…..and it seems fitting that we spent most of August’s Sculpture 30 activity outside with the sculptor version of Ray Mears.

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As an artist, a business person, a career person, a stay at home saint or any other type of busy bee, do you take the opportunity to get outside and appreciate the outdoors. Now I mean, REALLY appreciate – look around you, taking in the smells, the shapes of natural objects, the light…….

If you look closely enough, beauty and sculpture can be found and created in almost anything. Taking time out to do this is not only imperative for your mindfulness and inner wellbeing, it is also crucial part of the creative process; allowing yourself to think, reflect, reimagine and to get lost in the world around you, that you may see every day, but not take in.

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That’s what we focused on during August with our Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month Jane Gower. We got outside with different groups; adults, children, artists and creatives a like and we got using the natural world and materials around us to make beautiful sculptural pieces that both created meaning in the present and complemented the landscape.

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I spent an afternoon with Jane during a family Land Art workshop in Thornley Woods…..it was a fantastic afternoon spent making our names from natural resources around us and picking special objects during our trail.

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Whilst on our object hunt, we often stopped to talk about why we’d picked certain objects, why they visually seemed special to us and the beautiful colours, shapes and textures. It was fascinating to share perceptions and discover emotional attachments to inanimate objects.

Jane had also scattered on our route, several pieces of her land art that she had created making the afternoon feel like a mini sculpture trail of natural discovery.

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We used our materials to recreate the Gruffalo’s foot-steps – a series of footsteps with natural materials, to reimagine what he might like to eat and we ended our session making him a den.

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I had a fantastic afternoon – I found it grounding in the sense it reminded me of the creative possibilities that exist all around us every day and how these possibilities are constantly changing and evolving with nature. Moreover, this type of sculpture making is very accessible to everyone and something individuals, teams, groups and families can do as a collective.

After the session, I caught up with Jane Gower, our artist of the Month for August, to probe a little deeper into her practice, to find out what it is about the outdoors she loves so much and what exactly, ephemeral art is……?

Hi Jane, Tell me a little about yourself?

I love walking, especially with friends and family and ravelling around and camping in my converted transit van; also getting totally lost in creating a piece of work when I forget time, to eat and other people. I also love collaborating with other artists on projects.

Meeting new people is endlessly fascinating especially if I’m researching for a commission and find out about a whole different way of life.

I did a degree in Textiles and an M.A in Fine Art. My jobs from a previous life include; Stage-Management in London West End Theatres, running my own knitted textile business, clothing designer/production manager for a Fair Trade company, Art Foundation Course Lecturer and Community artist.

I have two children who have flown the nest.

Tell me about your practice?

I have been described as an eccentric art-scientist, experimenting with different materials: melting, shredding and generally deconstructing, then re-constructing the remains into some other form. This approach employed man-made materials. I’ve transferred this questioning recently, into testing the physical qualities of natural elements out in a rural environment. In doing so I’ve dropped the need for tools and equipment, finding the necessaries in a ‘make-do-Ray-Mears’ approach and adapting whatever’s lying around or re-thinking the process. This is very liberating. It involves trusting a spontaneous response to the natural environment and going with it.

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I also describe my practice as socially-engaged; involving participants in the creative process, using a range of media and techniques that is relevant for both the participants and to the installation site. The constant thread that runs through all my work is the intricacies of communication in the cultural realm: the disparity that lies between intention and interpretation.

Social engagement has decreased in recent times as I’ve been exploring this new direction in my practice.

Past commissions and residencies include; The Great North Run, The Sage Gateshead, Newcastle Riverside Sculpture Trail, The Tall Ships Race, Pallion, Cleadon and Gateshead PCT NHS Health Centres, among others.

Where can people go to see more of your work?

In terms of the Land Art work nothing can be seen in actuality as it’s so temporary but I’m on Instagram as jane_gower. I try and make one Land art piece a day, photograph it and upload onto the app every day.

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There are two large-scale, permanent, sculptural installations in the Trinity Square Health Centre at West Street, Gateshead. One is inside the surgery and one outside in the car park. Both were participatory pieces based around the question: ‘What makes you better?’. They are both permanent. Fabricated from printed and engraved clear or mirror acrylic they are different from resources I am currently using.

Voice recordings are often incorporated into my sculptural installations as I like to make evident the work process in the final piece and they bring animation.

I’ve just completed a sound piece: ‘Coastal Viewpoints’ in collaboration with Nicola Balfour for Durham Heritage Coast. We’ve been audio recording people out and about on the coastal path between Seaham and Horden. Their responses to the question: ‘What’s your view of this coastline?’ are being edited into QR points on the information boards along the path. People can hear some of the recordings on the FB page; ‘Coastal Viewpoints’.

What are your ties to the North East?

There are several factors:

I ran away from a London-life 28 years ago, for a job as clothing designer/production manager for the fair-trade company Traidcraft in Gateshead, and never went back.

I live on the border of three very different county boundaries; Northumberland, Durham and Gateshead. The diversity in terms of landscape, communities and culture is so varied and engaging, that it constantly inspires me.

I feel the North East has been one of the few areas in England that has valued artists’ contribution to its regeneration. Even though there has been a noticeable dearth of available arts funding recently, it still feels there’s potential to make a living as a free-lance artist here.

The North East has been good to me. Both my children were born here, so the area feels like part of our DNA.

For those who don’t know, what is “Ephemeral Land Art”?

Land Art refers to an art movement that began in the 60’s in which landscape and art is inextricably linked. It’s about experiencing natural spaces and responding to them using indigenous materials to create art and placing it in the natural environment. The ‘Ephemeral’ derives from a Greek word meaning lasting only one day. This encapsulates the temporary period that the artworks are expected to exist. Due to the raw materials being used and the spaces they are created in, out in the natural environment, they will start to deteriorate immediately. Open to the elements, to animal and human activity, the artworks only exists at the moment of creation. Documenting that moment through photography is the only way to keep the piece alive and give it longevity.

Why is getting outside important for creatives?

Getting outside whatever the weather for anyone, regardless of whether they are an artist or not, is very grounding. Even in an urban environment, I think to feel the elements and to be in natural light helps get things into perspective. Being outdoors invigorates and you are dealing immediately with the here-and-now basics of life.

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Having to find a way of working with the idiosyncrasies of a variety of natural forms, out in an uncontrollable environment, has its own particular challenges and rewards for creative people.

Can you tell me a little bit about your involvement with the Gateshead homeschoolers?

I was asked to work with a homeschooling group and their carers based in Gateshead. We spent 2 ½ days in Thornley Woods exploring the landscape, looking at all the resources available and using different techniques to make land art, prints and photographs. Sometimes everyone worked individually and sometimes as a team. We did lots of playing and walking, and discussing the natural environment   and our response to it. They were for me some very uplifting and informative days with an enthusiastic group of learners.

What is your favourite piece of Sculpture in the North East/the world?

One that always resonates with me is Cornelia Parkers’   Cold Dark Matter: An Exploded View (1991) A garden shed she had blown up by the British Army and suspended the fragments as if suspending the explosion process in time.

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Well thank you Jane, another fantastic Sculpture 30 artist of the Month.

As we draw ever closer to the end of Sculpture 30 Festival, I have to say I now view Sculpture in a whole new way. It is very accessible and incredibly diverse in art form, materials used, nature, inspiration…..I am also surprised to discover through-out the year, how “sculpture” is not really the isolated art form, I thought it was. It in fact infuses, permeates and influences Art and creative practices in a huge way….

Taking from Jane and I think we all can Culture Vultures; get outside more and really look at the natural world around you for it is full of undiscovered creative possibilities!

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Great North Snowdogs…..5 weeks to go!

It’s not long until The Great North Snow Dogs launches across the North East (19th September – so just over a month away!) and lots of Big and Small Snowdogs pop up across the region in cultural venues, landmarks and local hidden gems.

Each Big Snowdog has been design by a professional artist; the North East and of course, Gateshead on the Gateshead Trail are set to come alive with colour from the fantastic designs!

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Last week we caught up with Corinne Lewis-Ward; a brilliant Gateshead based artist and the business brains behind Powder Butterfly.

Corinne has been a long-time champion of Arts in Gateshead (and of course – Arts regionally, Nationally and Internationally). She has also been selected as an artist as part of The Great North Snow Dogs project working on two Big Snow Dogs.

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We wanted to catch up with her and find out more about her work, her practice and of course, more about Snowdogs!

Hi Corinne, can you tell me a bit about your practice?

Just like many creatives, I work in a variety of ways! I have my own creative practice as an artist but I also have my own design company which is called Powder Butterfly.

With my design company I am interested in representing well-loved landmarks from different locations in the UK. I currently have a Newcastle/Gateshead collection, a York collection and a London collection.

One Snow Dog design was inspired by my Newcastle/Gateshead collection. I have lived in the North east for 18 years and all of the landmarks hold a special place in my heart.

How did you hear about The Great North Snowdogs project?

I heard about The Great North Snowdogs at the North Design Centre in Gateshead. It was a really exciting event where we got to meet people from Wild In Art, St Oswalds and some of the sponsors and other creatives. There was a buzz about The Great North Snowdog project and I could tell that it would be wonderful to play a small part in it.

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Why did you decide/want to get involved?

I wanted to get involved because St Oswalds is an amazing organisation that carries out wonderful work throughout the North East, and being part of the raising money and awareness for their cause and activity was something that I really wanted to be part of.

I also love The Snowman and the Snow Dog animation, I enjoyed watching it with my kids and I could see how much fun this project was going to be with The Snowdog as the sculpture.

This project also took me out of my comfort zone to a certain degree as painting is not something that I do every day. Increasingly I work with digital media, but I was really keen to have the chance to use my art school experience to create something completely unique.

What was the process behind submitting your designs for your Dog and getting the green light?

The process was pretty simple really; I had to come up with a design in a two dimensional format and submit it as part of my application. I knew that I wanted to use the basis of my design from my Newcastle/Gateshead collection so I had a fair idea of how the artwork should look.

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I had to wait a few weeks before finding out if I had been successful. I knew that there would be selection process where sponsors would get to see the designs and then choose their favourite.

How did you feel when you found out, you’d been selected not once, but TWICE!?

I was really thrilled to find out that my Newcastle/Gateshead design had been selected from my original application. When I was working on it I was asked to carry out a VIP Snowdog commission which was amazing. Having two Snow Dogs on the sculpture trail is really wonderful and it is such an honour to be selected to carry out a VIP commission.

What were the inspirations behind your Snowdog designs? (only say as much as you can!)

Newcastle/Gateshead landmarks were the inspiration for my first design. All I can say about the VIP commission is that the design is based upon a well-loved British children’s author and illustrator.

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As you can imagine we all want to keep the sculpture trail a surprise for people so I wouldn’t want to reveal any spoilers.

Can you reveal any secrets regarding your Dogs, locations, names, sponsors?

The name of the Newcastle/Gateshead design is Tyne Tail Jack you can follow him on twitter @TyneTailJack . The lovely Sponsors are called The North Group and they have been operating in the North East for 150 years. The location of the dog will be on the Newcastle side of the Quayside.

As far as my VIP commission is concerned I am not able to reveal much at all about this lovely pup. But as soon as I do I will let you know what I can.

How does it feel as a Gateshead based Artist, to be featured within such a high profile North East campaign?

I am so proud to be part of this project. Although I am originally from London, I have lived in the North East for 18 years and I love it up here.

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I am so passionate about Gateshead and the amazing creative community that we have here. To be part of such a high profile campaign is wonderful and I am really excited to see how the local community and visitors to the region respond to the amazing work that artists from the local area and all over the country have created.

Each dog has its own very unique character and there are so many brilliant designs that have also been created by local schools and community groups as well.

Have you seen any other Snowdogs yet?

Yes I have seen some fabulous Snowdogs. I have been working in the studio in Newcastle that is provided for artists to work on the dogs and I am so excited that I have been lucky enough to meet some amazingly talented artists in the process.

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The studio is also the place where all completed dogs come to before the sculpture trail. So all of the school and community art dogs and the sculpture trail dogs end up there, so I am looking forward to seeing many more over the coming weeks.

Why are projects like this so important to the North East cultural agenda?

Events like this raise awareness of what is going on up here creatively and raise awareness of the great work St Oswalds does for people in the region.

It will also bring people from outside of the region to the area which will help introduce new audiences to the North East and help stimulate the local economy. With my design I have tried to help foster links between industry, the corporate world and the arts. I think the project model that Wild In Art have created really demonstrates how seemingly disparate bodies can work together to achieve great things creatively.

Do you intend to complete the wider Great North Snowdogs Public Art Trail and (of course!) the Gateshead Trail?

I can’t wait to attend the sculpture trail with my friends and family. It is going to be amazing to see how many pictures of the Snowdogs we can collect before they go to auction at the end of the year. It will be a once in a lifetime opportunity to document the event and see how many we can take pictures of. I am also excited to see where they all end up being located.

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After Gateshead Sculpture 30 Festival, Playground at Baltic and now Snowdogs, there seems to have been a bit of a shift towards more accessible, interactive sculpture and outdoor Art! We really love this as it gets people outdoors, exploring alongside engaging with Art and Sculpture! What do you think about this?

Any kind of project or campaign that makes art more accessible to a wider audience is something that I love to be part of. With my creative practice as an artist, I attempt to bring art and science together which could be seen as two entirely unrelated subjects. But I have found that audiences are really interested and engaged in this sort of work especially if you make the work engaging and accessible.

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The Great North Snow Dogs project is one of those special events that will get people exploring, engaging and sharing their experience through social media. I think I have also heard rumours of an app being created for the event so I am keen to see what that will be like. It’s going to be a wonderful and exciting event and I am so thrilled to be a small part of it.

How brilliant and thank you Corinne! So Culture Vultures – as of the 19th September, you have ten weeks, so find, discover and snap a selfie (or a snowfie, as we are calling them) with the Snowdogs across the region and of course Gateshead.

In the meantime; Tweet a “hello” to Corinne’s Snowdog @TyneTailJack, visit Snowdogs webpage to keep yourself up to date on all things Snowdog related including any app information. You can also catch them on @GreatNorthSnowdogs on Facebook and @great_snowdogs on Twitter.

We can’t waitttttt for Snowdogs!

Gilbert Ward July Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month.

Another Month over and another Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month; for July we have been lucky enough to have Gilbert Ward as our artist in residence in Saltwell Park!

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Gilbert is a local favourite sculptor with strong ties to Gateshead Riverside, Cheeseburn, Northumberland and he has recently completed a residency in Alnwick Gardens. Those of you, who keenly attend Anna Pepperall’s Public Art Walks may have even met Gilbert during an interpreted Riverside Walk, as he talked through his inspirations and practice when creating Foliate Forms’.

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Foliate Forms’ by Gilbert Ward (2010), Gateshead Riverside Park

Every Tuesday in July, 10am-3pm Gilbert pitched up next to the Rose Garden, in Saltwell Park and offered passers by the opportunity to see and experience Sculpture in Action. As it is in the midst of the Summer holidays, Gilbert was not in shortage of people in the Park eager and curious, to find out what he was doing!

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Through-out his time in Saltwell Park, Gilbert was working on a new piece called “The Kiss” made out of Doddington Stone; the piece really blossomed and developed across the month with many Park goers returning to see how the work was progressing.

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Some Park goers simply relaxed and took in his practice interested in the process, the form and the image but many, including myself, wanted to get more hands on and actually have a bit of a go whilst visiting the Park, a place many visitors describe as “the lungs of Gateshead”.

Speaking about sculpture Gilbert commented “I am a sculptor and a sculptor’s work is his statement. Sculpture cannot lie; it is an idea, material, form and structure, brought together in an object, which occupies a particular space with its presence.”

Gilbert was born proudly in 1935, in Yorkshire and like any typical Yorkshire man; he’s a big fan of his Yorkshire brew! He lives, works and of course sculpts in amongst the beautiful landscape of Northumberland.

Gilbert Ward has been commissioned to develop many sculptures across the North East of England. Gilberts work in stone and wood stems from a fascination with formal geometry and structures found within nature. Often carving on site or with communities Gilbert works to develop a sculptural response to a landscape.

One such piece is positioned in Saltwell Park – Foliate Carving. It’s a beautiful peace and there is something about it, something natural and connected the growing wonderland around it that feels so right and as if it truly belongs.

Foliate Carving – Gilbert Ward (2006)

“When I am working for a fixed site, I try to make the piece (usually in stone) fit the place, and fitting into its landscape. One hopes that those who pause upon finding the sculpture will come to an understanding of its meaning, and of it becoming a living part of their landscape.”

Gilbert has many more pieces across the North East and viewing them is a perfect opportunity to get outdoors and exploring this Summer. Another beautiful piece is situated up at Bowes and Tanfield Railway Paths……

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Standing Stone by Gilbert Ward.

Gilbert also has installed 2 collections of small sculptural works at Cheeseburn which he has been developing over the last 10 years: ‘Bakers Dozen’ (hornbeam) and ‘The Fall’ (ash).

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Cheeseburn – Gilbert Ward

Sited in the old potting shed at Cheeseburn these works explore the potential of natural forms for growth and evolution.

“I live in the hope that others will get the same amount of pleasure seeing the work, as I did in preparing and making it.”

Well with another month over in our Sculpture 30 celebrations, that means two things…… 1. We are nearing closer to the end of the year-long festival! Boo! But 2. We’re one month closer to the next Gateshead Family Sculpture Day, which this year is on 25th September, as always in Saltwell Park, in the Grove. We can’t wait!

Yeyyyy…….with less than two months to go, Gateshead’s 31st Sculpture day count down is officially on!

Colin Rose – Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month: June

 Colin Rose has been one of my favourite Sculpture 30 artists so far; he’s very down to earth and a hands on creative, which to me makes the often intangible creative process into something quite real and tangible. He also tells fantastic stories that go along with his Art and the positioning of each piece, which I could happily listen to all day.

Those of you, who pop into the Gallery at Gateshead Central library, may have caught his recent exhibition; charcoal earth paper.

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This body of work was inspired by his use of earth, charcoal and time in Australia. The pieces forced on every objects of little beautiful, that he has captured within rich drawings, making them so intrinsically beautiful and interesting to look at.

I spoke to several people who viewed his exhibition and the general thematic questions arose “who is Colin Rose?” and “where can I see more of his work?”. Such questions are surely a good sign……so this blog post is about just that; I’m going to tell you who he is and the local pieces you can go and view!

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Colin Rose is born and bred in the North East; like myself is a Northumbria University Graduate and is passionate not only about the “doing” side of Art but also the teaching side having held a variety of positions at local Universities. His work transcends different artistic mediums and materials; from rope work, to metal, to drawing, to toy trucks, to engineering feats of sculpture…..

I joined him on his recent Sculpture Tour on Saturday 18th June to view and find out more about his Public sculpture works in the region….

Our first stop was Window; local Gateshead folk will recognise the piece from the Bensham area on Rawling Road.

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Window (1986)

Window was commissioned as part of a regeneration project in the area and interestingly, irrespective of its size and dominance, very much blends into the urban architecture of the area. To me, at least someone born in 1985, it has always been there and I can’t imagine the space beforehand.

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Colin talked through the process of erecting such a piece; his love for Sculpture doesn’t just focus on the planning and making part, but also the “how on earth are we going to move this piece and get it into position???”. Apparently such problem solving trials have involved driving several cars into the ground……

Window is very much inspired by sound and form and for me, even just knowing the name “window” automatically shaped my view of what it represented; a window into Bensham and Gateshead. Colin purported his preference of hearing other people’s take on the sculpture and what “thing” they think it is before expressing his inspiration.

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And of course, he is quite right….. we all put individual meaning onto things, that can be radically changed once the artist states what it is. That’s another reason I like Colin, his love of listening to others and his “realness” about his art. I tend to find people try to see meaning in Art, sometimes beyond meaning that is actually there and full of metaphor….. sometimes a box can in fact just be a box and still be as brilliant.

The next piece we viewed was Swirl, which is on the Gateshead Quays, just behind Baltic. Swirl is another beautiful metal piece of sculpture that just perfectly “fits” with the surroundings. So much so, I assumed that Colin must have known about the wider developments of the area when he was commissioned to do it, but in fact he was unaware and responding to the surroundings pre-2010. It has a very strong sense of belonging.

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Swirl (2010)

What I love about Swirl, is that it is a piece that has become a part of people’s daily lives; my office was close by at the Northern Design Centre (there are lots of offices in Baltic Square) and people like myself often take time out of the office environment to each lunch there or even host a meeting by Swirl. Skaters skate around it and on it, students from Gateshead College sometimes sit doing their work next to it, it has become a prime wedding picture location for those having their party at the Baltic and it is a visitor hot spot on the Gateshead Quays. Swirl is the definition of accessible sculpture….

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In addition, I love that Swirl has been named by so many people; becoming a representation of what they visually see it as; the vortex, water down a plug hole, leaning tower, metal thing, stairs, like a slinky, stack of silver coins (my name!)…..maybe you have your own name for it too.

Interestingly it’s made using the same method as the statue of liberty with a central copper core that keeps it upright and balanced. The engineering feat of this piece is not a mistake, as Colin a sculptor who describes himself as “going against the grain”, decided against pursuing a career as an engineer and swapped into Fine Art, something that was quite controversial at the time. However, his experience as an engineer is very dominant in pieces such as Swirl, as his design is enabled through industrial, hands on experience.

The third piece we visited was Rolling Moon, in Riverside Park on Gateshead Quays; this sculpture is another feat of structural engineering. It was commissioned for Glasgow Garden Festival before finding its home in Gateshead.

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Rolling Moon (1989)

The piece represents the tide pulling back and forth the moon; when you look up at the piece it is difficult to understand how on earth the “moon” stays on us there.

Moreover, I think the piece has especially symbolic significance to the area; not only does it show the regeneration of the Riverside area which was in decline for some time but also the period pre-Angel, where Gateshead was beginning to position itself culturally and making great steps towards the vibrant Gateshead we know today.

The final piece on our tour was Wriggle in Saltwell Park. I live along the top of the Park and walk through it most days to get to and from work and I can honestly say, I’ve never noticed this piece; a true hidden gem.

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Wriggle (2006)

It sits down towards the stream area on the rocky area of once of the waterfalls and is inspired by the river and sound waves. It sits perfectly within its natural surroundings and the fact, it rusts a bright reddish colour, creates a colourful contrast on the green foliage.

If like me, your appetite to see more Colin Rose pieces remains, you can visit Cheeseburn during one of their open weekends as he has three pieces sited across the grounds.

So back to the present….I will be lurking (a favourite hobby of mine) with Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month: July, Gilbert Ward this coming Tuesday….come and say hiyerrr! Hopefully the sun will shine!

Over and out…

Gilbert in action

 

Cultural kid’s activities in Central Gateshead this Summer

The summer holidays are nearly here…..and I know what you’re thinking if you’re a parent!? What am I going to do with my mini mes over the Summer Holiday period……

Well there is LOTS going on in Central Gateshead, a real diverse mix of activities both indoors and outside for a range of ages. We want to keep your kids entertained, discovering new things and having lots of fun. That is what the English Summertime should all be about…..

Summer holiday activities kick off with a bang with a Theatre Set Design Workshop with Tanya Axford

Wailes Room, Gateshead Central Library – Saturday 16 July, 10am – 12.30pm

Work with visual artist Tanya Axford, who masterminded the set for ‘In A NutShell’ to create your very own imaginative theatrical world and become a part of it! This is a unique experience for theatre loving creatives to work with a professional!

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In A NutShell set – Tanya Axford

For ages 7+ (all children must be accompanied by an adult).

£ 3 per child

Click to book

We then move onto the launch of Summer Holiday Culture Camp

Camp

Have you got a budding artist at home who wants some inspiration in the summer holidays? Culture Camp gives young people aged 8-14 an opportunity to work with a different professional artist each day to try lots of interesting arts activities and materials.

Monday 25 JulyKate Eccles will help you to create your own unique hoodies and bags using recycled fabrics.

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Bring along something you don’t mind cutting up and transforming by adding horns, flowers, skulls or animals.

£20

Click to book

Tuesday 26 July – Artist Paul Merrick will have you mastering your drawing and painting skills using lots of different materials.

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Move from 2d to 3d over the day and turn some of your ideas into your own sculptural mobile to take home for your bedroom.

£20

Click to book

Wednesday 27 July – Try your hand at printmaking with experts from Northern Print Studio, with monoprinting in the morning and using letterpress in the afternoon to make cards, posters or bunting for your bedroom.

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£20

Click to book

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Minecraft Special is a free drop in session…

Gateshead Central Library – Wednesday 3 August, 11am

As part of the Summer Reading Challenge; bring books to life in Minecraft. Help us recreate a Minecraft Willy Wonka’s Chocolate factory.

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Free, just drop in!

More info

Welcome to the Circus: Workshop for all the family

Ever fancied learning some circus tricks to show off to your friends…..well we’ve got a corker of a session for you….

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St Mary’s Heritage Centre – Friday 5 August, 1pm-3pm

Become a trainee circus performer for the afternoon and try out some of the skills it takes to join the circus, including Plate spinning, Poi, Gymnastic Ribbon, Juggling, Hula Hoop, Tight Rope Walking and Beginners Stilts in this action packed session. Both children and adults will equally enjoy showing off their favourite skills at the graduation to the Big Top showcase where everyone will receive a certificate welcoming them to the circus.

This exciting and energetic workshop is suitable for anyone over 7 years, all equipment will be available.

£10 per participant

Click to book

Over The Moon Glass Workshop

Wailes Room, Gateshead Central Library – Saturday 6 August, 10am-12.30pm

Join glass artist Effie Burns to make ‘space’ inspired glass pieces that are out of this world, in this family friendly workshop.

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This workshop is perfect for parent and child to work together on a lovely glass project…..

Suitable for ages 7+

£10 – Please book places for both children and adults taking part.

Click to book

Mad About Monkeys

Have you got a cheeky monkey at home? Well this free workshop is perfect just for them….

Gateshead Central Library – Thursday 11 August, 2pm

A monkey sculpture craft afternoon for all the family.

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Free, reserve your place!

To reserve a place click

Whimsical Windchimes

Have you checked out the community garden at Gateshead Central Library; it’s always a hive of activity…..

Gateshead Central Library – Saturday 13 August, 10.30am

Join us to make your very own windchimes to hang in the garden this summer. Test them out first in our community garden!

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£2/£3 per child

Click to book

Creatures Up Close @ Central

Oooooh back by popular demand our beasties, creepy crawlies and unusual small animals…..book quick as this always sells out!

Gateshead Central Library – Monday 15 August, 2pm and 2.45pm

Your chance to get hands on and up close with some very unusual insects, reptiles and amphibians.

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£2/£3 per child

Click to book

I Dreamed A Jar

Have you seen the BFG? What would you put in your Dream Jar…… let’s find out!

Gateshead Central Library, Monday 22 August, 2pm

Staff at Central will be making their own Dream Jars so why not help them out or make one of your very own!

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Free

To reserve a place

Family Nature Doodling Workshop

The English summertime should be about getting outside and exploring…..

Meet at Thornley Woodlands Centre, off the A694 – Wednesday 24 August, 1pm – 4pm

Discover new ways of exploring our natural landscape through making temporary land art.

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Treehug – Jane Gower

Join Artist Jane Gower for a leisurely walk and explore the process of making – find beautiful objects in nature; seek out enchanting spaces; collect colours; and create sculptures and 3-D collages. They may only last a day, but you can capture your art piece in a photograph before it disappears.

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Ladders – Jane Gower

Please wear suitable clothing and shoes for the weather and bring a camera or phone to take photos of what you make.

£3/£5 – suitable for families

Click to book

Mrs Twit’s Trick Menu

Another Summer reading challenge activity……

Gateshead Central Library – Thursday 25 August, 2pm

Mrs Twit invites you to come along and sample her special menu. Do you fancy tomato-blood soup, octopus eyeballs or spider lollipops?

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Test your tastebuds and see which is the most delicious and make your own revolting recipe!

£1 per child

To reserve a place

Manga Workshop with Paul Belcher

Back by popular demand after last summer’s session…..

St Mary’s Heritage Centre – Thursday 25 August, 1pm-3pm

Local Community Artist Paul Belcher is returning to St Mary’s for his popular manga art session.

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It’s a great opportunity to learn some manga art techniques in this workshop suitable for children and adults. With Paul’s guidance you will create manga style portraits on A4 canvas using acrylics.

£5 per participant

Click to book

Summer Holiday Culture Camp – Make a Play in a Day

Do you have the next aspiring Jennifer Lawrence or Leo Dicaprio in your family?

Gateshead Central Library – Thursday 1 September, 9.30am – 4.30pm

Drama Teacher, David Raynor will help you create a play in a day; you get to experiment with a variety of acting and movement techniques, script writing and set design!

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£20

Click to book

Sculpture Making Workshop with Neil Canavan

Join Sculpture 30’s September artist of the month to get creating and making….

The Gallery, Gateshead Central Library – Saturday 3 September, 10am-12.30pm

Create mini sculptures that will help artist Neil Canavan create a largescale sculpture called ‘Juggernaut’ inspired by the large mobile structures that were pulled along by devotees in Hindu religious processions.

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Ship of Fools – Neil Canavan

The finished sculpture will feature at the 31st Gateshead Family Sculpture Day in Saltwell Park on 25 September!

Suitable for all ages and all materials provided.

Free, just drop in.

Click for more info

So get booking and reserving your places quick! This is just a flavour of Central Gateshead activities….there are more activities listed at www.gateshead.gov.uk/whatson at other branch library locations across Gateshead that you may want to check out!

 

 

 

 

 

July…. Saltwell Park meets Sculpture 30

July, ohhhh July, where is your summer sunshine and why is it hiding? I can’t promise sun shine for July, but I can promise a celebration of all things Saltwell Park as part of Gateshead Sculpture 30 Festival.

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I’ve grown up in Low Fell, living right along the top of the park my whole life, since I was about 18months old. It was where I first rode a bike (into a tree – my Dad caught it on video), it was where I used to play out during long hot 90’s summers, it was where my Grandma told me that all the fireworks on Bonfire night (my birthday) were just for me and everyone was celebrating (I was such a diva child that of course, that seemed quite plausible), it is my walk to route every morning and it is my go to place for reflection. I love it.

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Tyne Bridge – Alan J Smith, Red Box Design

Part of my job (my old job) was working for Local Studies and I did a lot of cataloguing of Saltwell Park images and history….. I really got to know the history and saw images of the park from different ages and people in the park socialising and their wonderful fashions of the time (60s-90s is always a favourite of mine…. 80s hair was just brilliant).

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Saltwell Park started life as a Victorian park in Gateshead. It was opened in 1876; the park was designed by Edward Kemp and incorporates the mansion and associated grounds of estate owner William Wailes. The park has flourished over the years and also during certain periods fallen into disrepair.

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Across 1999 – 2005, the Park received £9.6million funding from Gateshead Council and Heritage Lottery for restoration and now the park is back into full bloom. Whilst 2million people visit the park for simply enjoyment and recreation, it is also the home of multiple events across the year, Enchanted Parks, Gateshead Family Sculpture Day and Gateshead Bonfire Night.

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Enchanted Parks

So for July, Gateshead Culture Team are bringing a few events to Saltwell Park to celebrate culture in Saltwell Park.

Sculpture In Action

Every Tuesday (5th, 12th, 19th and 26th July, 10am-3pm) our July Sculpture 30 artist of the Month will be carving one of his stone sculptures in Saltwell Park. Gilbert has several pieces across the North East including Foliate Carving in Saltwell Park; he will be talking about his practice and pieces, so why not stop by and pay him a visit and see him in action.

Gilbert in action

He will be carving next to the Rose Garden, near Foliate Carving so just drop by!

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Foliate Carving – Gilbert Ward

Have you walked around the Park and noticed all the amazing and interesting pieces of art and sculpture dotted around and thought “what is that?”. I know I have!

Saltwell park Sculpture Walk (meet at Saltwell Towers)

Tuesday 5th July, 10.30am – 12.30pm

Join Anna Pepperall, Public Art Curator on this informal walk and talk and discover some of the varied pieces of Sculpture in Saltwell Park. Many of these pieces have both National and International acclaim, so for a culture vulture of the North East, this walk and talk is an amazing opportunity to see the Park from a different perspective.

To book   : https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3608

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Juxtaposition – Hideo Furuta

Creative Writing & Walking Workshop

Calling all budding writers…..we have a Creative Writing & Walking Workshop with writer and poet Ellen Phethean on 7th July, 6pm-8.30pm.

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Wiggle – Colin Rose

You will be using Saltwell park and the surroundings as inspiration and prompts for a series of writing exercises. This workshop will push you out of your writing comfort zone and we are so lucky to have the legendary Ellen to facilitate this. I love her work!

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To find out more about Ellen, follow this link…. http://www.diamondtwig.co.uk/people/ellen.phethean.html

To book and for more info: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3609#

So get yourself along to one of these events……..and if you can’t, well you have the whole summer to discover or rediscover Saltwell Park. I 100% know for a fact that it looks and feels better, with an ice-cream in hand….so that’s my top tip!

Over and out!

May Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month….avid tea drinker, sculptor and artist Russ Coleman

Another month has passed and another Sculpture 30 artist……… through-out May we celebrated and got to know Russ Coleman as our May Sculpture 30 artist of the Month.

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Russ is one of those artists that can see creativity in everything and works across a wide range of mediums; from concrete to stone, from illigraphy to abstract drawing, from performance to sculpture. He’s a true maker and creator (and avid tea drinker!).

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The Late Shows 2016

“I make things for my own amusement and curiosity; my mum said I used to make a mess and my wife says that I still do.” – Russ Coleman

During the course of May, Russ led a workshop providing the very unique opportunity to carve letters into stone, within Gateshead’s historical St Mary’s Heritage Centre taking inspiration from the variety of surrounding stone work and lettering.

Russ Coleman Stone Letter Carving May 2016

Russ also was a hugely popular feature of our Late Shows offering this year at St Mary’s Heritage Centre. The culture crawl weekend across NewcastleGateshead is on to its 10th birthday, this year and we knew we wanted to do something unique and a bit different; hence asking Russ to lead on a drop in session.

Over 80 people on the evening had a go using a variety of instruments making their own marks on to stone.

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The Late Shows 2016

I caught up with Russ just after the Late Show’s weekend as I wanted to find out more about his work and practice…..

Would you be able to tell me a little bit about yourself and your practice?

I wish that I could say that I make wondrous and diverse artworks for complicated and clever reasons. But in truth I am just trying to make sense of my life and experiences.

At heart I am still the 8 year old boy wanting to show you what he has discovered outside in the yard.

What got you into working with concrete and stone carving?

The 8 year old boy grew up and left school. In 1980, I signed up for a city and guilds course in bricklaying and construction at the local technical collage as well as starting an apprenticeship with my father as a monumental mason. I was also heavily into drama performing with the local youth theatre.

I learnt over the next 9 years how to build a house, how to carve letters in stone and how to create a theatrical experience.

I take all these skills forward into the work I make. I see no hierarchy of materials; it’s all star dust having gone through different processes. I do like hard stones for the fact that they may hold a form for centuries more than most materials. I like concrete for its property of being temporarily a powder, then a liquid and then a solid.

Your experience being involved in St Mary’s Late Shows?

I enjoyed both the Late Shows drop in sessions and the letter carving sessions. It is good to demonstrate a skill and the reasons behind certain moves or processes. It concentrates the mind and helps me focus on things that I take for granted, such as being able to hold a hammer and chisel without skinning my knuckles all the time (although this still happens regularly). People were genuinely keen to learn and a few were surprisingly adept.

Have you got a favourite project so far? I can see you’ve done such a diverse range of stuff, even part of a mini golf range (love mini golf!)

It was a full Nine hole course called Ocean Drive and had a rock pool underwater theme sited on the sea front at Filey. It was fun to make but I should have taken part payment as a percentage of takings as it was very popular and paid for itself within one season.

I have no particular favourites as I like different works for different reasons.

I like the bronze plaques on the Stone Jetty in Morecambe. They really stretched my ability, a lot of fine carving in plaster that needed to be fairly exact. There is a surprising difference between a Plaice a Dab and a Flounder and I couldn’t use colour to differentiate them so it was all in the form and the surface detail.

The New Hartley memorial path was a great project because of the subject and the depth of feeling that all the people involved in the project showed in its creation.

I always get enthusiastic about the next project; it’s always a discovery and a journey into the unknown.

Tell me a little bit about Cop Crag composition?

This was one of several pieces that I carved for the Stone Academy based at the Bowes museum in 2013 Cop Crag is the name of the quarry where the stone comes from it is just north of Hexham. It has an unusual colour for a sandstone you rarely get a brown almost honey colour stone mixed with red and orange tones, they’re nearly always one or the other.

The Composition element grew out of the use of several pieces of stone at the same time. I started carving about 6 pieces using the various different makings or shapes of the sawn offcuts as starting points. I would place one on top of the other and follow lines through both pieces or carry forms over two items. It became a rhythmic dialogue between the stone and my eyes and hands. I settled on a final composition towards the end of the 3 day session.

Cop Crag Composition by Russ Coleman

Cop Crag Composition – Russ Coleman

Because it was carved at speed without paying too much attention to what it actually was, I realised in retrospect that it contains all the movements, gestures shapes and forms that are thrown up by letter cutting and construction.

What’s the future hold?

I have been working on some new pieces that bring all the elements of my interests together. They spring from that sense of wonder I mentioned earlier and the intent is to present the things I enjoy, they are a kind of heavy duty nature table made by a 52 year old boy

Favourite piece of Gateshead Sculpture?

Windy Nook. It holds fond memories for me and was made by an old tutor of mine. I like the fact that it has become part of the landscape and is thought of as being there for a lot longer that it has been.

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The New Hartley Memorial Pathway – Russ Coleman

So another month and another Sculpture 30 artist….however, our engagement with Russ Coleman is not quite finished yet. He is facilitating two interconnected fantastic ‘Abstract Expressionism Drawing Workshops’ on Wednesday 10th August and Wednesday 14th September, 6pm- 8pm.

If like me, you love drawing, but not traditionally good at it, this is YOUR opportunity to get creative with Russ; learn and experiment with a variety of mark making and drawing techniques. He will guide you and give you new ways to approach drawing with different medias to construct your abstract masterpiece.

For both sessions it is £15 and you can book your place now!

See you soon fellow Culture Vultures…..

 

Sculpture 30 April Artist of the Month – Joseph Hillier

 

“We are surrounded by useful but meaningless things” – Joseph Hillier 2016

It’s quite apt that I’m writing this piece on a sunny day after just finishing a cultural art walk around Gateshead; Sculpture 30 festival has firmly moved outside this season, come rain or shine for the final four months of the festival. And I guess, you could say we are on the home stretch of the festival (but we’ve got lots of activity planned for Summer to round it off – so don’t fret!) and this is an ideal opportunity to reflect on a potential highlight so far?

Well for me, that was most certainly April Sculpture 30 artist of the month; Joseph Hillier Sculpture Tour.

Joe was born in Cornwell, but went to University in Newcastle and now resides in Gateshead, Blaydon. He is widely exhibited in galleries and sculpture parks and has seventeen large-scale permanent installations nationally and internationally. You can read more about his pieces and bio on his website.

Our Sculpture tour, with Joe was fantastic and saw 12 culture vultures on a mini bus travelling to his many sited Sculptures around the North East. Even the weather turning from glorious sun shine, then to sleet, then snow, then a mini hurricane and back to sun, didn’t dampen our mood.

The tour was really brought to life, as Joe talked through his practice, his inspirations and each piece; a fantastic opportunity to hear from the sculptor about his take on the work. The story of conception to sited sculpture is often long, complicated and very interesting, so it was great to listen to his experiences, something that the pieces themselves just don’t highlight.

Stop one – Faith – QE Hospital

 

Stop two – Mortal8 – next to Souter Lighthouse

Stop three – Lunch time – Souter Lighthouse and beach

Stop four – Generation – Newcastle University

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Stop five – Joe’s workshop – Blaydon

Joe’s workshop was fascinating as we got to see pieces in progress, parts of past projects, mistakes, his equipment; it really was a treasure trove for culture vultures! Joe showed us the process of planning a sculpture and the various models and techniques he uses to scale up to a much larger piece.

He also shows us how to use a 3D scanner and his 3D printer…..technology heaven.

I caught up with Joe after tour and took the opportunity to probe a little deeper and find out about his upcoming projects!

  1. Do you have a favourite piece of your sculpture?

 

There are pieces which have been pivotal for my practice, those are probably Being Human, my first solo gallery show in New Orleans, Mortal 8, now in South Shields and In Our Image in Newton Aycliffe. It’s a strange thing when you feel the objects you have made start to define you.

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In Our Image – Newton Aycliffe

2. What is your favourite piece of Sculpture in Gateshead and why?

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  1. Do you have a global favourite piece and why?

At the moment it might be “the ecstasy of St Teresa” by Bernini. The work is explicit, gravity defying and so baroque. I think these are all the things artists currently deny, but I want to revisit this sort of grand illusion and magic. Bernini creates a true installation using architecture, sculpture, painting, gilding – everything is considered to transport the viewer.

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  1. Why is sculpture an important art form?

Because we are surrounded by useful but meaningless things. Sculpture can be the exact opposite, useless but communicative. I hope to make objects that speak, not literally with words, but things that can speak to people directly, without words.

  1. 5.       How can the public engage with Sculpture more readily to appreciate and explore it?

I am the public, we are all the public. I just prefer to think of other people, clever apes like me. The first thing to do is to look at sculpture, as you might listen to music. Just allow yourself to enjoy it and it can change the way you look at everything else.

  1. Your sculptures often focus on the human body; why? What is it about the human form that interests you?

I like and am most interested by people. I also like lying. To make a lump of mud (i.e. clay) look like the thing we know best, ourselves, is one of the most primal impulses. After going to art school and considering sculpture in all its forms I sort of reconsidered and recentered my practice on the human body because I felt it offered the opportunity to communicate ideas, attitudes and thoughts in the most eloquent and unsettling of ways, to reach directly inside my viewers. Like a silhouette, a shadow in an alleyway instantly speaks to us, I am interested in those instants before out intellect has time to catch up.

  1. Do you have any sculptural projects up and coming that you can let us know about?

No they are top secret.

  1. What would you like your sculptural legacy and impact to be?

When anyone says legacy I think of Tony Blair on his Legacy tour at the end of his stint in power. I don’t think you get to choose your legacy that is for everyone else to decide. I would like to leave some things behind to speak on my behalf though.

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70% H2O – Blaydon Leisure Centre

All of Joe’s pieces are extremely accessible, so if you haven’t already, discover Joseph Hillier and his brilliant sculptures! The thing I most like about his pieces are their location; they are often situated as pieces of public art, in places you don’t really stop to appreciate the art, they become part of the urban landscape. They blend in. Very much like the people you see every day on your morning commute, we know them intimately, but yet it isn’t until we actually take a moment in the present to really look, do we in fact discover.

We until next time culture vultures……..

 

Spring is coming….. I promise!

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Rise and Fall-Lulu Quinn (2007)

With Spring on the way…..it’s time to start thinking and getting excited about our outdoor Sculpture 30 activities we’ve got coming up.

Now, I know if you look out of the window, you’re probably thinking “Spring!?!” but I promise you it’s coming; it’s March and the flower buds are starting to pop up and say hello; I’ve got some Daffs in my living room at home.

Well what better way to discover sculpture then actually going to see it, touch it and to learn all about it. These Sculpture 30 outdoor activities give you the opportunity to do just that…..

Gateshead Quays Art Walk on Saturday 2nd April, 1pm – 3.30pm.

Our art walks are one of the highlights of our cultural programme; a chance for you to really get to know public art and sculpture in Gateshead. Pieces you may walk passed every day or hidden gems! This walk focuses on exploring the Public Art works along Gateshead quays, taking in sculpture, contemporary glass and urban design.

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5,000 Bolts—Walter Jack Studio (2011)

This walk is led by Anna Pepperall, Gateshead Council’s Public Art Curator. Anna has been doing Public Art talks and curating Public Art in Gateshead since before The Angel of The North, so we are delighted that for this activity we have her as host.

To book: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3430

Sculpture Tour with Joseph Hillier on Thursday 14th April, 4pm – 8pm

Join Sculptor Joseph Hillier for a tour of some of his publicly sited sculptures followed by an exclusive visit to his studio. This mini bus tour will visit and explore Faith at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, and Primary Care Centre and Joseph’s studio in Blaydon.

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70% H2O – Joseph Hillier (2010)

Joseph Hillier is our Sculpture 30 Artist of the Month for April, so this is an unique opportunity to get to know his pieces and to explore his practice.

To book: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3437

Sculpture Tour with Joseph Hillier on Saturday 23rd April,l 10am – 4pm

Sculptor Joseph Hillier explores of some of his publicly sited sculptures during this full day tour followed by an exclusive visit to his studio. The mini bus will visit Faith at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Mortal8 at Souter Lighthouse, Generation at Newcastle University and Joseph’s studio in Blaydon.

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Mortal 8 – Joseph Hillier (2014)

Is there a better way to spend a Saturday? This exciting opportunity is for a true culture vulture!

To book: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3438

Creative Walking & Writing Workshop with Jeremy Warr, Saturday 7th May, 10am – 12.30pm

Join Jeremy Warr, at St Mary’s Heritage Centre, for a writing workshop and walk with a difference. You’ll be using some of the many public artworks on Gateshead Quays and Riverside as inspiration for a series of writing exercises.

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Beacons – David Pearl (2004)

We want you to bring your notebook and pens and learn from an expert, whilst feeling inspired by the wonderful Public Art and culture around you.

During this peaceful afternoon, you’ll be able to reimagine and reframe sculptural pieces with your words and metaphors.

To book: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3439

Gateshead Urban Art Walk, Saturday 21st May, 1pm-3.30pm

Anna Pepperall, Gateshead Public Arts Curator returns to explore some of the Public Art works in and around Gateshead Town Centre during this interpreted public art. Find out about the new Trinity Development and the fantastic piece “Halo” by Sculpture 30 December Artist of the Month, Steve Newby.

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Halo – Steve Newby (2014)

There are so many hidden gems within the Gateshead Central area, so this walk is an opportunity to learn and reflect on some of these pieces and the process behind their conception, construction and maintenance.

To book: https://online.gateshead.gov.uk/EventTicketsOnline/pages/eventdetails.aspx?ky=3431

Lots of outdoor Sculpture 30 activity coming up; so get booked before these walks sell out. Fingers cross we will get lovely days for them, but as with all things outdoors in the British Summer/Spring, please be prepared and dress for British weather!

If you’d like any information, please contact CBSArtsTeam@Gateshead.gov.uk

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